First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Matthew SiglerFollow

Title of Poster or Paper

Stuck Walking Down Memory Lane

Mentor/s

Professor Rick Magee

Location

Panel A: UC 108

Start Day/Time

4-21-2017 11:00 AM

End Day/Time

4-21-2017 12:15 PM

Abstract

Both Blanche Dubois in Tennessee William’s A Streetcar Named Desire and Willy Loman in Death of a Salesman have gone through tragic events in their past which shape their psyches of the present. Their fragmented minds are both a blessing and a burden because they use their distorted views of reality to cope with the actual events going on around them but, the events occurring around them stem from their traumatic past and hallucinations. They are forced to constantly deal with two types of reality before they eventually reach their demise. Blanche experiences a metaphysical death, being forced to go to the Asylum and Willy faces a physical death because he commits suicide. Both of these ends are tragic but their inevitable demise is only second to the constant onslaught of psychological trauma they must suffer through the traffic of the stage. Their PTSD is also the very driving force that propels the events in the plays, it influences their actions very heavily and causes them to do things that is normally out of their character. For instance: Blanche Dubois begins sleeping around with random men and eventually a student from the school she works in. Willy Loman plants a garden even though he knows nothing will grow and eventually commits suicide from his dead brother’s advice. Throughout the plays both Blanche DuBois and Willy Loman use their past as a coping mechanism, which in turn provides the characters with depth and a purpose to their actions, before descending into their tragic pasts.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

College and Major available

English

Keywords

Blanche Dubois, Willy Loman, PTSD, Psychological trauma

Original Publication Date

12-2016

Document Type

Essay

Comments

Paper written as a Capstone senior project for ENGLISH 390, for students majoring in English with the literature concentration.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Apr 21st, 11:00 AM Apr 21st, 12:15 PM

Stuck Walking Down Memory Lane

Panel A: UC 108

Both Blanche Dubois in Tennessee William’s A Streetcar Named Desire and Willy Loman in Death of a Salesman have gone through tragic events in their past which shape their psyches of the present. Their fragmented minds are both a blessing and a burden because they use their distorted views of reality to cope with the actual events going on around them but, the events occurring around them stem from their traumatic past and hallucinations. They are forced to constantly deal with two types of reality before they eventually reach their demise. Blanche experiences a metaphysical death, being forced to go to the Asylum and Willy faces a physical death because he commits suicide. Both of these ends are tragic but their inevitable demise is only second to the constant onslaught of psychological trauma they must suffer through the traffic of the stage. Their PTSD is also the very driving force that propels the events in the plays, it influences their actions very heavily and causes them to do things that is normally out of their character. For instance: Blanche Dubois begins sleeping around with random men and eventually a student from the school she works in. Willy Loman plants a garden even though he knows nothing will grow and eventually commits suicide from his dead brother’s advice. Throughout the plays both Blanche DuBois and Willy Loman use their past as a coping mechanism, which in turn provides the characters with depth and a purpose to their actions, before descending into their tragic pasts.

 

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