First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Michael GiambroneFollow

Mentor/s

Dr. Matthew Moran

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-21-2017 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-21-2017 3:00 PM

Abstract

Due to the high incidence of running-related injury, biomechanical flaws of the running stride must be investigated.¹ RunScribe™ footpods are light-weight devices that clip onto the shoe and record kinematic variables with each step.² PURPOSE: This study will investigate the influence of footpod placement on the validity of RunScribe™ output compared to hi-speed video analysis. METHOD: Ten collegiate distance runners (6 female, 4 male, 20.9yo ± 0.7yo; 170.2cm ± 6.9cm; 61.4kg ± 7.9 kg) volunteered to participate and granted informed consent. Participants were fit with left-sided body-markers along the line of the achilles tendon and superior-inferior axis of the shoe’s heel-counter, a RunScribe™ on both the left laces and heel, and ran for two, 5-min sessions on a treadmill (Woodway, Desmo). High-speed cameras (Casio EX-10, 210 Hz) recorded in the sagittal and frontal planes. The last 21 strides were analyzed using Kinovea computer software and compared to data downloaded from RunScribe™ for stride-length, stride-rate, ground-contact-time (GCT), pronation-excursion, and max pronation-velocity. Validity and reliability of measurements between RunScribe™ and video were assessed with SPSS and intraclass correlation coefficients, respectively. RESULTS: There was a strong correlation between data from both footpod locations and Kinovea for all sagittal plane variables tested, specifically GCT and stride-rate. There is a much stronger relationship between the heel and Kinovea (r=0.905) than the laces and Kinovea (r=0.204) for max pronation-velocity. CONCLUSION: RunScribe™ is an accurate tool in assessing GCT, stride-rate, and stride-length. Heel-placement will likely output more accurate frontal plane data than the laces.

College

College of Health Professions

College and Major available

Exercise Science UG

Keywords

Running injuries, Running stride

Document Type

Poster

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Apr 21st, 1:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:00 PM

Influence of Placement on the Validity of RunScribe™

University Commons

Due to the high incidence of running-related injury, biomechanical flaws of the running stride must be investigated.¹ RunScribe™ footpods are light-weight devices that clip onto the shoe and record kinematic variables with each step.² PURPOSE: This study will investigate the influence of footpod placement on the validity of RunScribe™ output compared to hi-speed video analysis. METHOD: Ten collegiate distance runners (6 female, 4 male, 20.9yo ± 0.7yo; 170.2cm ± 6.9cm; 61.4kg ± 7.9 kg) volunteered to participate and granted informed consent. Participants were fit with left-sided body-markers along the line of the achilles tendon and superior-inferior axis of the shoe’s heel-counter, a RunScribe™ on both the left laces and heel, and ran for two, 5-min sessions on a treadmill (Woodway, Desmo). High-speed cameras (Casio EX-10, 210 Hz) recorded in the sagittal and frontal planes. The last 21 strides were analyzed using Kinovea computer software and compared to data downloaded from RunScribe™ for stride-length, stride-rate, ground-contact-time (GCT), pronation-excursion, and max pronation-velocity. Validity and reliability of measurements between RunScribe™ and video were assessed with SPSS and intraclass correlation coefficients, respectively. RESULTS: There was a strong correlation between data from both footpod locations and Kinovea for all sagittal plane variables tested, specifically GCT and stride-rate. There is a much stronger relationship between the heel and Kinovea (r=0.905) than the laces and Kinovea (r=0.204) for max pronation-velocity. CONCLUSION: RunScribe™ is an accurate tool in assessing GCT, stride-rate, and stride-length. Heel-placement will likely output more accurate frontal plane data than the laces.

 

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