First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Michelle MartinsFollow

Title of Poster or Paper

In-vivo confirmation of A-alpha mating-type identity predicted from genomic sequences in Schizophyllum commune

Mentor/s

Kirk Bartholomew

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-21-2017 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-21-2017 3:00 PM

Abstract

Shizophyllum commune is a mushroom-forming fungus that has long-served as a model system for investigating the molecular control of development through study of its complex mating system. The A mating-type loci, Aα and Aβ, contribute to partial determination of self vs. non-self partners during the initial step in sexual development. The Aα locus has been extensively studied and encodes homeodomain proteins that interact to alter expression of genes required for sexual development. We have analyzed the predicted genes of the Aα locus in the genomes of two strains of S. commune of unknown mating type and formulated hypotheses concerning their mating-type identity based on comparison to previously characterized mating-type loci of known identity. The results of our in-silico analysis will be presented along with progress in confirming these predictions in vivo.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

College and Major available

Biology

Document Type

Poster

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
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Apr 21st, 1:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:00 PM

In-vivo confirmation of A-alpha mating-type identity predicted from genomic sequences in Schizophyllum commune

University Commons

Shizophyllum commune is a mushroom-forming fungus that has long-served as a model system for investigating the molecular control of development through study of its complex mating system. The A mating-type loci, Aα and Aβ, contribute to partial determination of self vs. non-self partners during the initial step in sexual development. The Aα locus has been extensively studied and encodes homeodomain proteins that interact to alter expression of genes required for sexual development. We have analyzed the predicted genes of the Aα locus in the genomes of two strains of S. commune of unknown mating type and formulated hypotheses concerning their mating-type identity based on comparison to previously characterized mating-type loci of known identity. The results of our in-silico analysis will be presented along with progress in confirming these predictions in vivo.