First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Keara BohannonFollow

Mentor/s

Professor Barbara Pierce

Location

Panel C: UC 107

Start Day/Time

4-21-2017 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-21-2017 3:15 PM

Abstract

Migratory birds engage in strenuous exercise and continuous fat oxidation, both of which are known to increase oxidative stress and potentially lead to damage of membrane lipids, proteins and DNA. It is theorized that migratory birds have numerous antioxidant defense systems in order to cope with their increased level of oxidative stress. Avian erythrocytes, for instance, are equipped with a number of enzymatic antioxidants to limit damage, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The level and nature of fat content in their diet is also thought to play a role in coping with oxidative stress. In this study, subjects of the species Sturnus vulgaris were fed diets varying in both polyunsaturated fatty acid content, either 32% or 13%, and antioxidant levels, either high or low, to illustrate the combined effects of diet and exercise on superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Each of the four diet groups contained 25 subjects, 15 of which underwent flight training in a wind tunnel, while the other 10 served as controls. Erythrocyte samples were collected from each subject at the onset of the experiment prior to serve as a background, and samples were again taken immediately prior to sacrifice, following the experimental bird’s most demanding flight. Samples were also collected immediately before and after the most demanding flight. The samples were kept at -80oC until processing. In conducting GPx assays on the samples, the protocol of Caymen Glutathione Peroxidase Assay Kit was followed. It is expected that each subject’s exposure and reaction to oxidative stress will vary based on dietary group and exercise.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

College and Major available

Biology

Keywords

Migratory birds, Birds, Migration, Oxidative stress

Document Type

Poster

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Apr 21st, 2:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:15 PM

Avian Migratory Flight & Oxidative Stress: The Impact of Exercise on Erythrocytic Antioxidant Defense Systems

Panel C: UC 107

Migratory birds engage in strenuous exercise and continuous fat oxidation, both of which are known to increase oxidative stress and potentially lead to damage of membrane lipids, proteins and DNA. It is theorized that migratory birds have numerous antioxidant defense systems in order to cope with their increased level of oxidative stress. Avian erythrocytes, for instance, are equipped with a number of enzymatic antioxidants to limit damage, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The level and nature of fat content in their diet is also thought to play a role in coping with oxidative stress. In this study, subjects of the species Sturnus vulgaris were fed diets varying in both polyunsaturated fatty acid content, either 32% or 13%, and antioxidant levels, either high or low, to illustrate the combined effects of diet and exercise on superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Each of the four diet groups contained 25 subjects, 15 of which underwent flight training in a wind tunnel, while the other 10 served as controls. Erythrocyte samples were collected from each subject at the onset of the experiment prior to serve as a background, and samples were again taken immediately prior to sacrifice, following the experimental bird’s most demanding flight. Samples were also collected immediately before and after the most demanding flight. The samples were kept at -80oC until processing. In conducting GPx assays on the samples, the protocol of Caymen Glutathione Peroxidase Assay Kit was followed. It is expected that each subject’s exposure and reaction to oxidative stress will vary based on dietary group and exercise.

 

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