First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Sarah BentFollow

Mentor/s

Professor Beau K. Greer

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-21-2017 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-21-2017 3:00 PM

Abstract

Distance runners’ knowledge regarding iron deficiency has been previously examined. Knowledge of the acute or chronic effects of iron toxicity, however, has never been assessed. The purpose of the present study was to investigate college distance runners’ knowledge about issues related to basic nutrition and iron toxicity, as well as influences on the choice to supplement with iron. Ninety-eight college distance runners (54 F; 44 M) were recruited from three Division 1 programs in the northeastern U.S. to participate in a 22-question, pen-and-paper survey. Major findings were that the mean score for a 10-item question asking respondents to identify high-iron sources of food was only 43 out of 100 possible points, while 73.6% of respondents reported either moderate or high confidence in the ability to identify iron-rich foods. Additionally, while only 29.6% have been diagnosed with an iron deficiency at any point in life, 37.9% are currently taking an iron supplement. Of those supplementing with iron, 88.9% reported taking more than 45 mg/day, the tolerable upper limit. The mean score was 7.5 out of 24.0 possible points when given a scale of statements related to positive and negative health and performance effects of iron supplementation. 52% of respondents reported that a coach at some point in their running career had suggested taking an iron supplement. In conclusion, college runners did not show a high level of knowledge regarding the potential negative effects of high iron intake, and many may be at risk for iron toxicity.

College

College of Health Professions

College and Major available

Exercise Science UG

Keywords

Runners, Iron deficiency

Document Type

Poster

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Apr 21st, 1:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:00 PM

Knowledge of Iron Deficiency vs. Toxicity in College-level Distance Runners

University Commons

Distance runners’ knowledge regarding iron deficiency has been previously examined. Knowledge of the acute or chronic effects of iron toxicity, however, has never been assessed. The purpose of the present study was to investigate college distance runners’ knowledge about issues related to basic nutrition and iron toxicity, as well as influences on the choice to supplement with iron. Ninety-eight college distance runners (54 F; 44 M) were recruited from three Division 1 programs in the northeastern U.S. to participate in a 22-question, pen-and-paper survey. Major findings were that the mean score for a 10-item question asking respondents to identify high-iron sources of food was only 43 out of 100 possible points, while 73.6% of respondents reported either moderate or high confidence in the ability to identify iron-rich foods. Additionally, while only 29.6% have been diagnosed with an iron deficiency at any point in life, 37.9% are currently taking an iron supplement. Of those supplementing with iron, 88.9% reported taking more than 45 mg/day, the tolerable upper limit. The mean score was 7.5 out of 24.0 possible points when given a scale of statements related to positive and negative health and performance effects of iron supplementation. 52% of respondents reported that a coach at some point in their running career had suggested taking an iron supplement. In conclusion, college runners did not show a high level of knowledge regarding the potential negative effects of high iron intake, and many may be at risk for iron toxicity.

 

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