First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Melissa FerloFollow

Mentor/s

Professor Eric Scibek

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-21-2017 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-21-2017 3:00 PM

Abstract

The lower quarter y-balance test (YBT) is a pre-participation functional movement assessment used to assess dynamic balance. The YBT has been evaluated in a number of studies to identify asymmetry in movement and individuals at risk of musculoskeletal injury. Asymmetries have been associated with a higher risk of lower extremity injury in athletes. It is not known how YBT performance differs between athletes that participate in asymmetrical sports compared to sports with symmetrical movement patterns. The purpose of this study was to assess differences in YBT performance between dominant (D) and non-dominant (ND) limbs in athletes participating in sports with asymmetrical movement patterns, as compared to athletes that participate in sports with symmetrical movement patterns. Healthy athletes that participate in sports with either symmetrical or asymmetrical movement patterns participated in this study. The YBT kit (Move2Perform) has a stance platform and 3 wooden dowels that reach out in the anterior (A), posteromedial (PM), and posterolateral (PL) directions. Participants stood with one leg on the stance platform and extended the other out in each of the reach directions for 3 recorded trials. Six practice trials were given in each direction. Reach direction and the starting stance leg were randomized. Reach distances were normalized by leg length. It is anticipated that normalized reach differences of the D and ND limbs between athletes participating in asymmetrical sports compared to symmetrical sports will be different. Differences in normalized reach performance in some populations has been identified as a potential risk factor for musculoskeletal injury.

College

College of Health Professions

College and Major available

Exercise Science UG

Keywords

Dynamic balance, Movement assessment, Assymetry, Athletes

Document Type

Poster

Comments

Undergraduate Senior Capstone Project.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Apr 21st, 1:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:00 PM

Assessment of YBT Performance in Athletes that Participate in Asymmetrical Sports

University Commons

The lower quarter y-balance test (YBT) is a pre-participation functional movement assessment used to assess dynamic balance. The YBT has been evaluated in a number of studies to identify asymmetry in movement and individuals at risk of musculoskeletal injury. Asymmetries have been associated with a higher risk of lower extremity injury in athletes. It is not known how YBT performance differs between athletes that participate in asymmetrical sports compared to sports with symmetrical movement patterns. The purpose of this study was to assess differences in YBT performance between dominant (D) and non-dominant (ND) limbs in athletes participating in sports with asymmetrical movement patterns, as compared to athletes that participate in sports with symmetrical movement patterns. Healthy athletes that participate in sports with either symmetrical or asymmetrical movement patterns participated in this study. The YBT kit (Move2Perform) has a stance platform and 3 wooden dowels that reach out in the anterior (A), posteromedial (PM), and posterolateral (PL) directions. Participants stood with one leg on the stance platform and extended the other out in each of the reach directions for 3 recorded trials. Six practice trials were given in each direction. Reach direction and the starting stance leg were randomized. Reach distances were normalized by leg length. It is anticipated that normalized reach differences of the D and ND limbs between athletes participating in asymmetrical sports compared to symmetrical sports will be different. Differences in normalized reach performance in some populations has been identified as a potential risk factor for musculoskeletal injury.

 

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