First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Amanda Orsillo, Sacred Heart UniversityFollow

Mentor/s

Dr. Wendy Bjerke

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-21-2017 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-21-2017 3:00 PM

Abstract

Background & Purpose: Although hydration is the major concern in hotter climates, nutrition status can affect performance. In moderate climates MREs have been validated to meet the standards of the Military Dietary Reference Intakes. However, in hot climates preference of cooler foods and the anorectic effect can cause nutrient deficiencies. The purpose of this review was to examine the effect of the food ration “Meal, Ready-to-Eat” (MRE) on the performance of male armed services personnel in hot climates.

Methods: This literature review included a search of Department of Defense databases with the following search terms: “MREs”, “hot climate”, and “military performance”. Articles published between post-Persian Gulf War (1991) to present-day conflicts (2016) were referenced. Only articles where performance was affected due to nutrition status for males were included, performance affected due to dehydration and females were excluded.

Results: Findings from the review revealed energy requirements increase 2.5-10% in temperatures between 86°F-104°F. During an 8-week course an Army garrison had decreases in total body mass, maximal lift strength, power output, and vertical jump height. In a military equivalent group on a low-carbohydrate diet glycogen levels were depleted suggesting a 30-40% decrease in endurance and a 10-25% decrement in explosive power.

Conclusions: Deficiencies in macronutrients and micronutrients lead to decreased physical and mental performance predominately during prolonged exertion. Although decreases in performance can arise in hot climates due to MREs not specific for climate, other factors include unacclimated personnel and trading of MRE components.

College

College of Health Professions

College and Major available

Exercise Science UG

Keywords

Exercise performance, Nutrition

Document Type

Poster

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Apr 21st, 1:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:00 PM

MRE Nutrition and Performance Among Male Armed Services Personnel in Hot Climates

University Commons

Background & Purpose: Although hydration is the major concern in hotter climates, nutrition status can affect performance. In moderate climates MREs have been validated to meet the standards of the Military Dietary Reference Intakes. However, in hot climates preference of cooler foods and the anorectic effect can cause nutrient deficiencies. The purpose of this review was to examine the effect of the food ration “Meal, Ready-to-Eat” (MRE) on the performance of male armed services personnel in hot climates.

Methods: This literature review included a search of Department of Defense databases with the following search terms: “MREs”, “hot climate”, and “military performance”. Articles published between post-Persian Gulf War (1991) to present-day conflicts (2016) were referenced. Only articles where performance was affected due to nutrition status for males were included, performance affected due to dehydration and females were excluded.

Results: Findings from the review revealed energy requirements increase 2.5-10% in temperatures between 86°F-104°F. During an 8-week course an Army garrison had decreases in total body mass, maximal lift strength, power output, and vertical jump height. In a military equivalent group on a low-carbohydrate diet glycogen levels were depleted suggesting a 30-40% decrease in endurance and a 10-25% decrement in explosive power.

Conclusions: Deficiencies in macronutrients and micronutrients lead to decreased physical and mental performance predominately during prolonged exertion. Although decreases in performance can arise in hot climates due to MREs not specific for climate, other factors include unacclimated personnel and trading of MRE components.

 

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