First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Shauna Santos-DempseyFollow

Mentor/s

Amanda Moras and Bronwyn Cross-Denny

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-21-2017 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-21-2017 3:00 PM

Abstract

The medically supported benefits of breastfeeding for mothers and their children include, but are not limited to : decreasing the risk of pneumonia, diarrhea, and type-II diabetes, acting as a method of hormonal birth control, and decreasing the incidence of post-partum depression (World Health Organization, 2015). According to the World Health Organization (2015), breastfeeding is also the most economically secure way to ensure proper nutrition for an infant. However, cultural norms of the United States, as evidenced in the media and public opinion, exploit and sexualize the bodies of women. Many families, therefore, are hesitant to breastfeed for fear of judgement, or refuse to breastfeed as a result of internalized oppression (Woods, Chesser, & Wipperman, 2013). Research shows that most women make decisions about parenthood and breastfeeding long before they choose to have children (Ho & McGrath, 2016). The teenage years are those in which individuals form their identity and do so largely in the context of their social environment (Erikson, 1993). Furthermore, studies suggest that social supports are a major contributing factor to breastfeeding attitudes and intentions (Seidel et al., 2013). Therefore, this research proposal presents a format of evidence based education to target the adolescent population to address this issue of not only public and women’s health, but women’s rights.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

College and Major available

Social Work

Document Type

Poster

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Apr 21st, 1:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:00 PM

The Impact of Breastfeeding Education on Attitudes Toward Breastfeeding in Adolescents Attending Public Urban, Suburban, and Rural High Schools

University Commons

The medically supported benefits of breastfeeding for mothers and their children include, but are not limited to : decreasing the risk of pneumonia, diarrhea, and type-II diabetes, acting as a method of hormonal birth control, and decreasing the incidence of post-partum depression (World Health Organization, 2015). According to the World Health Organization (2015), breastfeeding is also the most economically secure way to ensure proper nutrition for an infant. However, cultural norms of the United States, as evidenced in the media and public opinion, exploit and sexualize the bodies of women. Many families, therefore, are hesitant to breastfeed for fear of judgement, or refuse to breastfeed as a result of internalized oppression (Woods, Chesser, & Wipperman, 2013). Research shows that most women make decisions about parenthood and breastfeeding long before they choose to have children (Ho & McGrath, 2016). The teenage years are those in which individuals form their identity and do so largely in the context of their social environment (Erikson, 1993). Furthermore, studies suggest that social supports are a major contributing factor to breastfeeding attitudes and intentions (Seidel et al., 2013). Therefore, this research proposal presents a format of evidence based education to target the adolescent population to address this issue of not only public and women’s health, but women’s rights.

 

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