First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Kristin ZimmermanFollow

Mentor/s

Dr. Gerald Reid Dr. Stephen Lilley

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-21-2017 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-21-2017 3:00 PM

Abstract

Accessing academic resources is a significant factor in educational success at the college level. Based on Bourdieu’s concept of economic and cultural capital and Lareau’s theory of social inequality it is hypothesized that students from high socioeconomic status will access academic resources at a significantly higher rate than students of lower socioeconomic status. In a survey of 120 college students, the hypothesis was tested. Basic hypothesis testing showed no significant difference between students at different income levels in accessing academic resources. Advanced hypothesis testing did display a significant difference in males and undergraduate seniors from higher socioeconomic families. A more diverse and sufficient sample would be needed to further test this hypothesis. Further studies should focus on students with same the GPA in different socioeconomic classes, and take into consideration other factors contributing to the rate at which students access academic resources.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

College and Major available

Sociology

Document Type

Poster

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Apr 21st, 1:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:00 PM

Use of Academic Resources Among Different Socioeconomic Classes

University Commons

Accessing academic resources is a significant factor in educational success at the college level. Based on Bourdieu’s concept of economic and cultural capital and Lareau’s theory of social inequality it is hypothesized that students from high socioeconomic status will access academic resources at a significantly higher rate than students of lower socioeconomic status. In a survey of 120 college students, the hypothesis was tested. Basic hypothesis testing showed no significant difference between students at different income levels in accessing academic resources. Advanced hypothesis testing did display a significant difference in males and undergraduate seniors from higher socioeconomic families. A more diverse and sufficient sample would be needed to further test this hypothesis. Further studies should focus on students with same the GPA in different socioeconomic classes, and take into consideration other factors contributing to the rate at which students access academic resources.