First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Michelle PerrottaFollow

Mentor/s

Stephen Lilley

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-21-2017 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-21-2017 3:00 PM

Abstract

In our current society, are people deeming themselves “too busy” to be able to have face to face interactions? Instead, is it a new norm to decide to have more of a relationship with one’s phone, social media, etc. and to work more towards keeping a connection with technology than to connect with members of one’s family at home? A cross-sectional survey was conducted to test whether a correlation exists between use of communication technology and family interaction. The hypothesis of this study is that as communication technology use increases, there is a significant decrease in interaction with family members. To test this hypothesis a nonprobability sample of 75 students from different universities and colleges on the East Coast were sent a web based survey. The survey measured the amount of communication technology usage and, how often physical family interaction occurs.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

College and Major available

Sociology

Keywords

Social media, Communication technology, Family interaction

Document Type

Poster

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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Apr 21st, 1:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:00 PM

Communication Technology Use on Family Interaction and Relationships

University Commons

In our current society, are people deeming themselves “too busy” to be able to have face to face interactions? Instead, is it a new norm to decide to have more of a relationship with one’s phone, social media, etc. and to work more towards keeping a connection with technology than to connect with members of one’s family at home? A cross-sectional survey was conducted to test whether a correlation exists between use of communication technology and family interaction. The hypothesis of this study is that as communication technology use increases, there is a significant decrease in interaction with family members. To test this hypothesis a nonprobability sample of 75 students from different universities and colleges on the East Coast were sent a web based survey. The survey measured the amount of communication technology usage and, how often physical family interaction occurs.

 

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