First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Eve PapaFollow

Participation Type

Paper Talk

Mentor/s

Professor Cara Kilgallen

Location

Panel B: Academic Building HC 111

Start Day/Time

4-20-2018 11:00 AM

End Day/Time

4-20-2018 12:15 PM

Abstract

This paper will provide an original perspective on the multifaceted debate about eugenics in modern global society through an in-depth literary analysis of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Birthmark.” The various opinions and perspectives involved with the debate will be further explained in comparison to the short story’s theme and character development. The central argument of this research can be found in the fixation of the short story’s main character on the correction of disability in the seemingly isolated world in which he lives. The research in this paper will be additionally drawn from scholarly articles, including the work of Elizabeth R. Napier and Rosemarie Garland- Thomson, and disability literature, including Temple Grandin’s autobiography. The ideas that this research will lay out and support can be read as a lens through which to view the arguments existing both in this paper and in society at large.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

College and Major available

English

Original Publication Date

12-13-2017

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

Comments

Paper prepared for ENG 239, Reading & Writing Disability, Dr. Kilgallen, December 13, 2017.

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Apr 20th, 11:00 AM Apr 20th, 12:15 PM

Hawthorne’s “The Birthmark” as an Introduction to the Modern Debate of Eugenics and their Societal Implications

Panel B: Academic Building HC 111

This paper will provide an original perspective on the multifaceted debate about eugenics in modern global society through an in-depth literary analysis of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Birthmark.” The various opinions and perspectives involved with the debate will be further explained in comparison to the short story’s theme and character development. The central argument of this research can be found in the fixation of the short story’s main character on the correction of disability in the seemingly isolated world in which he lives. The research in this paper will be additionally drawn from scholarly articles, including the work of Elizabeth R. Napier and Rosemarie Garland- Thomson, and disability literature, including Temple Grandin’s autobiography. The ideas that this research will lay out and support can be read as a lens through which to view the arguments existing both in this paper and in society at large.

 

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