Participation Type

Poster

Mentor/s

Professor Deirdre M. Yeater

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-20-2018 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-20-2018 3:00 PM

Abstract

As both wild and captive dolphin calves develop, they spend less time with their mothers and more time engaged in independent activities. In this study, the social development of six captive dolphin calves (Tursiops truncatus) were examined over the first and second year of life. Focal animal behavioral ethogram data were collected using a 30 second scan sampling technique. The predominant swim position and individual behaviors were recorded. There were a number of general developmental patterns: (1) an increase in the percentage of time that the calves engaged in solo swimming, (2) a decrease in infant position, and (3) a decrease in echelon position. The shift in primary swim position and increase in independent (solitary) behaviors exhibited over the study is consistent with past research on calf development. The basis for the difference each calf’s behavior could be a result of the experience or type of mother, the unique personalities in the calves, or a combination of both.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

College and Major available

Psychology

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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Apr 20th, 1:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:00 PM

Mother-Calf Interactions in Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus

University Commons

As both wild and captive dolphin calves develop, they spend less time with their mothers and more time engaged in independent activities. In this study, the social development of six captive dolphin calves (Tursiops truncatus) were examined over the first and second year of life. Focal animal behavioral ethogram data were collected using a 30 second scan sampling technique. The predominant swim position and individual behaviors were recorded. There were a number of general developmental patterns: (1) an increase in the percentage of time that the calves engaged in solo swimming, (2) a decrease in infant position, and (3) a decrease in echelon position. The shift in primary swim position and increase in independent (solitary) behaviors exhibited over the study is consistent with past research on calf development. The basis for the difference each calf’s behavior could be a result of the experience or type of mother, the unique personalities in the calves, or a combination of both.

 

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