First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Laina IueleFollow

Participation Type

Paper Talk

Mentor/s

Dr. Eileen Yost

Location

Panel E: Academic Building SC 202

Start Day/Time

4-20-2018 11:00 AM

End Day/Time

4-20-2018 12:15 PM

Abstract

A GUIDE TO BONDING IN THE NEONATAL ICU

Authors: Laina Iuele

Advisor: Dr. Eileen Yost

iuelel@mail.sacredheart.edu, yoste@sacredheart.edu

Abstract

My capstone project was designed to educate and promote parent-infant bonding in the Neonatal ICU (NICU) at Greenwich Hospital. When a newborn is admitted to the NICU, often the natural bonding that occurs after birth, between mother and baby, is interrupted. This time for the newborn is crucial as the attachment process is essential for the growth and development of the infant. Bonding has numerous benefits for the newborn, especially those who require extra care in the NICU. Providing a pamphlet to parents, in conjunction with patient teaching, will aid in the initiation and continuation of bonding, allowing for better infant and parent outcomes.

Background: Newborns can be admitted to the NICU for a number of reasons, including prematurity, respiratory instability, and cardiac issues. Premature babies are especially at risk for negative consequences related to preterm birth, as their body systems. According to the World Health Organization, 15 million infants are born premature every year (Gulla, Dahlø, & Eilertsen, 2017).

Community Assessment and Assessment Findings: When a newborn is admitted to the NICU, it can often be difficult to initiate parent-infant bonding. Parents are fearful of their newborn’s status and worry if they are capable of caring for their infant. Through bonding, parents’ stress is reduced, they have greater confidence in their ability to care for their baby, and increased feelings of closeness. Additionally, bonding stabilizes temperature, breathing, and oxygen saturation of the newborn (Cho et al., 2016).

Purpose: Providing education and promoting parent-infant bonding in the NICU at Greenwich Hospital through a patient-teaching pamphlet, in order to improve health outcomes through increased bonding.

Methods: Educating the newborn’s parents while distributing the pamphlets to encourage bonding. Providing education will allow parents to understand the positive outcomes associated with bonding for both the child and parents. They will be able to keep the pamphlet for reference on the benefits of bonding and the ways that the parents and infant can bond, while in the NICU.

Results: Bonding will increase between parent and infant, allowing for better outcomes and earlier discharge.

Discussion/Conclusion/Implications: Pamphlets will be distributed on the unit in the upcoming weeks. By doing this, families will be provided with the necessary information to bond with their newborn. Physiologic stability and psychological well-being will be promoted leading to earlier discharge of mother and baby.

College

College of Nursing

College and Major available

Nursing BSN

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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Apr 20th, 11:00 AM Apr 20th, 12:15 PM

A Guide to Parent-Infant Bonding in the Neonatal ICU

Panel E: Academic Building SC 202

A GUIDE TO BONDING IN THE NEONATAL ICU

Authors: Laina Iuele

Advisor: Dr. Eileen Yost

iuelel@mail.sacredheart.edu, yoste@sacredheart.edu

Abstract

My capstone project was designed to educate and promote parent-infant bonding in the Neonatal ICU (NICU) at Greenwich Hospital. When a newborn is admitted to the NICU, often the natural bonding that occurs after birth, between mother and baby, is interrupted. This time for the newborn is crucial as the attachment process is essential for the growth and development of the infant. Bonding has numerous benefits for the newborn, especially those who require extra care in the NICU. Providing a pamphlet to parents, in conjunction with patient teaching, will aid in the initiation and continuation of bonding, allowing for better infant and parent outcomes.

Background: Newborns can be admitted to the NICU for a number of reasons, including prematurity, respiratory instability, and cardiac issues. Premature babies are especially at risk for negative consequences related to preterm birth, as their body systems. According to the World Health Organization, 15 million infants are born premature every year (Gulla, Dahlø, & Eilertsen, 2017).

Community Assessment and Assessment Findings: When a newborn is admitted to the NICU, it can often be difficult to initiate parent-infant bonding. Parents are fearful of their newborn’s status and worry if they are capable of caring for their infant. Through bonding, parents’ stress is reduced, they have greater confidence in their ability to care for their baby, and increased feelings of closeness. Additionally, bonding stabilizes temperature, breathing, and oxygen saturation of the newborn (Cho et al., 2016).

Purpose: Providing education and promoting parent-infant bonding in the NICU at Greenwich Hospital through a patient-teaching pamphlet, in order to improve health outcomes through increased bonding.

Methods: Educating the newborn’s parents while distributing the pamphlets to encourage bonding. Providing education will allow parents to understand the positive outcomes associated with bonding for both the child and parents. They will be able to keep the pamphlet for reference on the benefits of bonding and the ways that the parents and infant can bond, while in the NICU.

Results: Bonding will increase between parent and infant, allowing for better outcomes and earlier discharge.

Discussion/Conclusion/Implications: Pamphlets will be distributed on the unit in the upcoming weeks. By doing this, families will be provided with the necessary information to bond with their newborn. Physiologic stability and psychological well-being will be promoted leading to earlier discharge of mother and baby.

 

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