First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Elena BurkeFollow

Participation Type

Poster

Title of Poster or Paper

Fertility Rate & Infant Mortality Rate

Mentor/s

Professors Khawaja Mamun and Michael Gorman

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-20-2018 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-20-2018 3:00 PM

Abstract

Enclosed in this research report is the analysis of the effect of a nation’s infant mortality rate (per 1,000 live births) on fertility rate. The objective of this paper to evaluate the topic by conducting a cross-country analysis. The paper evaluates the effects of infant mortality rate on fertility rate across 80 countries between 1990 and 2015, in five-year time intervals. The additional control variables examined are female labor force as a percentage of total labor force, GNI growth as an annual percentage and secondary education enrollment female percentage. The empirical method conducted found that a nation’s infant mortality, female labor force and secondary education enrollment are significant at a one percent level, while GNI growth is not significant at any level.

College

Welch College of Business

College and Major available

Business Economics, Finance, Marketing

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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Apr 20th, 1:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:00 PM

Fertility Rate & Infant Mortality Rate

University Commons

Enclosed in this research report is the analysis of the effect of a nation’s infant mortality rate (per 1,000 live births) on fertility rate. The objective of this paper to evaluate the topic by conducting a cross-country analysis. The paper evaluates the effects of infant mortality rate on fertility rate across 80 countries between 1990 and 2015, in five-year time intervals. The additional control variables examined are female labor force as a percentage of total labor force, GNI growth as an annual percentage and secondary education enrollment female percentage. The empirical method conducted found that a nation’s infant mortality, female labor force and secondary education enrollment are significant at a one percent level, while GNI growth is not significant at any level.

 

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