First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Mackenzie FoleyFollow

Participation Type

Poster

Mentor/s

Dr. Valerie Wherley

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-20-2018 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-20-2018 3:00 PM

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of varying complex developmental disabilities, where the main areas of difficulty are in social communication, social interaction and restricted or repetitive behaviors and interests.1 Some typical behaviors associated with ASD include delayed speech, difficulty making eye contact or holding a conversation, poor motor skills, sensory sensitivities and unusual selfstimulatory repetitive behaviors. A few common repetitive behaviors include hand flapping, jumping, rocking, echolalia, etc.2 In order to cope with these behaviors, complementary and alternative medical (CAM) treatments are frequently sought out for children with autism spectrum disorders. One form of a CAM is yoga. According to a study published by the International Journal of Yoga Therapy, evidence shows a positive correlation between the core areas of yoga (the combination of breathing techniques, movement and body awareness) and attentiveness in children with ASD. The more attentive a child is the less self-stimulating behaviors they will engage in. Furthermore, this study and displays data that suggest yoga is a more favorable CAM, because not only does it increase the attentiveness of the child, but it also increases a sense of personal control, awareness and decreases anxiety and self-stimulatory actions. 3,4 This study examined the prevalence of time-on-task skills of a 18-year-old non-Hispanic, black male, diagnosed with ASD in both a group and a one on one setting after participating in a 5-week yoga program. In both scenarios timeon- task progressively increased throughout the sessions, thus showing that yoga may be implemented and used as a coping mechanism/CAM for this specific subject.

College

College of Health Professions

College and Major available

Exercise Science UG

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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Apr 20th, 1:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:00 PM

A Yoga Program for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and its impact on Lower Extremity Flexibility and Time-On-Task

University Commons

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of varying complex developmental disabilities, where the main areas of difficulty are in social communication, social interaction and restricted or repetitive behaviors and interests.1 Some typical behaviors associated with ASD include delayed speech, difficulty making eye contact or holding a conversation, poor motor skills, sensory sensitivities and unusual selfstimulatory repetitive behaviors. A few common repetitive behaviors include hand flapping, jumping, rocking, echolalia, etc.2 In order to cope with these behaviors, complementary and alternative medical (CAM) treatments are frequently sought out for children with autism spectrum disorders. One form of a CAM is yoga. According to a study published by the International Journal of Yoga Therapy, evidence shows a positive correlation between the core areas of yoga (the combination of breathing techniques, movement and body awareness) and attentiveness in children with ASD. The more attentive a child is the less self-stimulating behaviors they will engage in. Furthermore, this study and displays data that suggest yoga is a more favorable CAM, because not only does it increase the attentiveness of the child, but it also increases a sense of personal control, awareness and decreases anxiety and self-stimulatory actions. 3,4 This study examined the prevalence of time-on-task skills of a 18-year-old non-Hispanic, black male, diagnosed with ASD in both a group and a one on one setting after participating in a 5-week yoga program. In both scenarios timeon- task progressively increased throughout the sessions, thus showing that yoga may be implemented and used as a coping mechanism/CAM for this specific subject.

 

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