First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Erin ThomasFollow
Kathryn M. DarlingFollow

Participation Type

Poster

Mentor/s

Professor Peter Ronai

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-20-2018 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-20-2018 3:00 PM

Abstract

Introduction: “Chemo-brain” is a term used to describe cognitive deficits or abnormalities that result from chemotherapy treatments. Recent studies have shown that exercise and physical activity may be an effective method for elevating cognitive function in breast cancer.

Methods: The reviewers conducted a search for pertinent literature regarding positive effects of physical activity on the cognitive deficits related to chemotherapy treatment in women with a history of breast cancer.

Results: There is a significant relationship between exercise frequency and cognitive deficits in breast cancer patients. Physical activity lead to increases in memory recall, visual memory, composite memory, attention, verbal memory, working memory, and information processing speed. Participants with higher levels of physical activity reported fewer negative effects on cognition.

Discussion: Results from research included within this review of pertinent literature seem to indicate that physical activity and exercise can help to lessen the cognitive deficits in breast cancer patients caused by chemotherapy treatments, known as “Chemo-Brain.” Physical activity is thought to help with cognitive functioning due exercise-induced neurogenesis, inducing beneficial effects on cognition. However, further investigation and expansion of these results is necessary.

Conclusion: If researchers can establish new and effective intervention methods, in the form of physical activity, clinicians can then help to improve breast cancer patients’ overall quality of life. As a result, this will prompt the need for more research in this field of study. Future research can also help clinicians to prescribe the most appropriate exercise type, duration, and frequency based on patients’ chemotherapy regimen.

College

College of Health Professions

College and Major available

Exercise Science UG

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

Comments

Kathryn Darling- Exercise Science

Erin Thomas- Exercise Science

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Apr 20th, 1:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:00 PM

Determining the Effects of Exercise and Physical Activity on the Cognitive Deficits that Result from Chemotherapy Treatment in Female Breast Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review

University Commons

Introduction: “Chemo-brain” is a term used to describe cognitive deficits or abnormalities that result from chemotherapy treatments. Recent studies have shown that exercise and physical activity may be an effective method for elevating cognitive function in breast cancer.

Methods: The reviewers conducted a search for pertinent literature regarding positive effects of physical activity on the cognitive deficits related to chemotherapy treatment in women with a history of breast cancer.

Results: There is a significant relationship between exercise frequency and cognitive deficits in breast cancer patients. Physical activity lead to increases in memory recall, visual memory, composite memory, attention, verbal memory, working memory, and information processing speed. Participants with higher levels of physical activity reported fewer negative effects on cognition.

Discussion: Results from research included within this review of pertinent literature seem to indicate that physical activity and exercise can help to lessen the cognitive deficits in breast cancer patients caused by chemotherapy treatments, known as “Chemo-Brain.” Physical activity is thought to help with cognitive functioning due exercise-induced neurogenesis, inducing beneficial effects on cognition. However, further investigation and expansion of these results is necessary.

Conclusion: If researchers can establish new and effective intervention methods, in the form of physical activity, clinicians can then help to improve breast cancer patients’ overall quality of life. As a result, this will prompt the need for more research in this field of study. Future research can also help clinicians to prescribe the most appropriate exercise type, duration, and frequency based on patients’ chemotherapy regimen.

 

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