First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Trent ThompsonFollow

Participation Type

Poster

Mentor/s

Dr. Khawaja Mamun (Sacred Heart University Jack Welch College of Business, Department of Economics)

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-20-2018 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-20-2018 3:00 PM

Abstract

Through pooled cross-sectional analysis of data from the OECD’s triennial Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), we estimate the effects of a nation’s research and development expenditure on scientific literacy. Controlling for economic, educational, and demographic factors for over sixty countries between 1998 and 2015, we find that the amount of funds a nation allocates towards research and development has a positive and statistically significant association with scientific literacy. These results suggest that, along with established socioeconomic and educational determinants of scholastic achievement, the prioritization of research and development by a nation—beginning with policymakers—may function as a tacit cultural approval of science, and therefore may be auspicious to the quality and efficacy of science education.

College

Welch College of Business

College and Major available

Business Economics

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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Apr 20th, 1:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:00 PM

The Impact of a Nation’s Research and Development Expenditure On Scientific Literacy

University Commons

Through pooled cross-sectional analysis of data from the OECD’s triennial Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), we estimate the effects of a nation’s research and development expenditure on scientific literacy. Controlling for economic, educational, and demographic factors for over sixty countries between 1998 and 2015, we find that the amount of funds a nation allocates towards research and development has a positive and statistically significant association with scientific literacy. These results suggest that, along with established socioeconomic and educational determinants of scholastic achievement, the prioritization of research and development by a nation—beginning with policymakers—may function as a tacit cultural approval of science, and therefore may be auspicious to the quality and efficacy of science education.

 

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