Date of Award

Fall 2015

Degree Type

Certificate of Advanced Study

Department

Educational Leadership

Advisor

Michael K. Barbour

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine how perceptions on inclusion impact supports of both special needs and regular education students in first grade. In order to grow a stronger understanding of what perceptions are in place, the perception had by teachers and administrations, and their direct impact on supports provided, two first grade classes, two classroom teachers, and one administrator were used to seek the answers we were looking for. This study explored the impact perceptions had on two first grade teachers, one administrator, and the impacts of support on 32 first grade students. Quantitative and qualitative methods of data were collected using semi-structured interviews, observations, the Teacher Attitudes Towards Inclusion Education survey, and a self-created survey modeled by the Teacher Attitudes Towards Inclusion Education survey. Over a six week data collection period, themes were noted between teacher and the administrator responses with a direct connection to supports and inclusion efforts discovered during the two classroom observations. The research recommended two implications to practice. These implications included recommendations for administrators to be more aware of how their perceptions directly impact measures of inclusion occurring in the school and teachers, as well as administrators, sharing their perceptions freely amongst each other to set forth effective inclusion measures to best meet all student needs.

Comments

A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the coursework required for the post-masters' Certificate of Advanced Studies (CAS) in Educational Leadership.


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