Title

Health Action Process Approach: Application to Medication Adherence in Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2015

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) post-intentional constructs (maintenance self-efficacy, recovery self-efficacy, action planning, coping planning) and medication adherence among phase II cardiac rehabilitation (CR) patients. Research Method: Purposive sampling was used to recruit 91 phase II CR patients age 50 years and over. All respondents completed paper and pencil questionnaire examining HAPA post-intentional constructs (action planning, coping planning, maintenance self-efficacy, recovery self-efficacy), medication adherence, and demographic characteristics. Validity and reliability were confirmed for all scales included in the questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to describe respondents’ characteristics. Bivariate statistics (correlation, Mann-Whitney U-test, Kruskal Wallis test) were used to examine associations between medication adherence and each HAPA post-intention construct as well as medication adherence and respondent demographic characteristics. Results: Better medication adherence was associated with greater maintenance self-efficacy (-.290, .006) and better action planning skills (r=-.233, p = .027) and coping planning skills (r=-.277, p = .008) as indicated by higher scores on the maintenance self-efficacy, action planning, and coping planning scales. There was no significant linear relationship between medication adherence and recovery self-efficacy (r=-.103, p = .335) or medication adherence and any of the respondents’ demographic characteristics (p > .05). Only maintenance self-efficacy remained significant in a multivariate model predicting medication adherence. Conclusions: Greater maintenance self-efficacy was associated with increased medication adherence; health professionals working in CR settings might consider opportunities to enhance maintenance self-efficacy for medication adherence. Additional research is needed to identify strategies for promoting maintenance self-efficacy for medication adherence.

Comments

Accepted author version posted online: 12 May 2015

DOI

10.1080/03601277.2015.1048147