Date of Award

Spring 2013

Degree Type

Thesis

Department

Exercise Science

First Advisor

Matthew Moran

Abstract

Purpose: To determine if any kinematic differences exist between two common sprint drills (A- and B-drills) and maximal sprinting. Methods: 12 collegiate sprinters (19.17±1.11 y/o) granted informed consent were filmed performing two 40-meter sprints, A-skips, and B-skips. Three-dimensional motion analysis tracked the coordinates of 24 reflective markers and resulting joint kinematics were computed. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that sprinting yielded a significantly lower maximum hip flexion (p=0.015) but a significantly higher minimum ankle angular velocity (p=0.012) and step rate (p=0.000) value than A-drills. When compared to B-drills, sprinting values were significantly lower in maximum hip flexion (p=0.047), minimum knee flexion (p=0.043), and maximum hip angular velocity (p=0.006), but significantly higher in minimum ankle angular velocity (p=0.018) and step rate (p=0.000). Experienced sprinters had a significantly greater maximum plantar-flexion in sprinting (p=0.031) and minimum knee flexion in A-drills (p=0.030) than inexperienced sprinters. Inexperienced sprinters had a significantly greater plantar-flexion in A-drills (p=0.026) and B-drills (p=0.046), B-drill maximum knee flexion (p=0.016), maximum ankle angular velocity (p=0.024), and minimum knee angular velocity (p=0.048) than experienced sprinters. Conclusion: Since several kinematic differences exist between two common sprint drills as compared to maximal sprinting, efficacy of their uses is questioned.

Comments

An undergraduate thesis submitted to the Thomas More Honors Program in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree in Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Science.


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