Date of Award

Spring 2013

Degree Type

Thesis

Department

Exercise Science

First Advisor

Valerie Wherley, PhD

Abstract

Congenital Hydrocephalus (CH) is a condition at birth where excess cerebral spinal fluid accumulates in the ventricles of the brain due to inadequate drainage, resulting in an increase in intracranial pressure and damage to the surrounding nervous tissue. Although hydrocephalus is successfully treated at birth, a resulting diagnosis of a memory-related learning disorder is common. However, having multiple independent subsequent diagnoses is unique. This report mainly describes a 13 year-old boy who was diagnosed and treated for congenital hydrocephalus at birth and then was subsequently diagnosed with multiple co-morbidities, such as partial agenesis of the Corpus Callosum, Cerebral Palsy with ataxic gait (CP), mild spasticity of the quadriceps group, Developmental Encephalopathy, and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). In addition to Occupational and Physical Therapy, this student also participated in a weekly group exercise program, which not only attended to individual movement goals, but also added a social component to treatment. Activities were structured to incorporate the individual needs of each student, but to also foster a group atmosphere and a need to work together to successfully complete the activity. Some activities included baseball, kickball, and Zumba dancing. After the conclusion of the 12-week program, the social gains and adaptations were clearly evident, however more time would have been required to identify specific physical benefits.

Comments

An undergraduate thesis submitted to the Thomas More Honors Program in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree in Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Science.


Share

COinS