Title

Narrative and Meaning-Making among Manhattan Social Workers in the Wake of September 11, 2001

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2015

Abstract

This qualitative study was a thematic analysis of categories of meaning-making contained in the written narratives of 139 clinical social workers living and working in New York City on September 11, 2001 (9/11) related to their personal and professional experiences of the World Trade Center attack. Themes included personal growth and benefit found in the wake of 9/11, the ongoing experience of adversity, and professional growth and lessons learned. Situated in the context of the literature on narrative and meaning-making, the findings offer further support
for meaning-making as an intrinsic human activity and shed light on the various ways clinicians integrate an experience of shared trauma. Implications for theory, practice, policy, and future research are suggested.

Comments

12 month embargo applies before posting of author's accepted version of article.

McTighe, John P. and Carol Tosone. "Narrative and Meaning-Making among Manhattan Social Workers in the Wake of September 11, 2001." Social Work in Mental Health. Accepted author version posted online: 21 Nov 2014 DOI: 10.1080/15332985.2014.977420

DOI

10.1080/15332985.2014.977420