First and Last Name/s of Presenters

David BocachFollow

Participation Type

Paper Talk

Title of Poster or Paper

A Look at Modern Day Bilingualism

Mentor/s

Professors Amanda Moras and Mark Jareb

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Location

Panel H: University Commons UC 105

Start Day/Time

4-20-2018 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-20-2018 3:00 PM

Abstract

Bilingualism is a fascinating phenomenon that can affect many different aspects of a person’s life. By mastering and being fluent in at least two languages, untold opportunities, changes, and perspectives can be learned and further explored. Experiencing life in two languages can almost be like experiencing two different worlds or seeing things from multiple perspectives. People become bilingual for a variety of factors such as assimilation, integration, higher education, or through their profession. Becoming bilingual can affect not only the person’s life, but also their own physiology and neurological activity, economic and social standing, and cultural and historical perception. Such specific factors will be the focus of this study as to how bilingualism affects one’s life. Taking reference from such works as Vega-Mendoza et al’s The impact of late, non-balanced bilingualism on cognitive performance and Gasquoine’s Effects of Bilingualism on Vocabulary, Executive Functions, Age of Dementia Onset, and Regional Brain Structure, the neurological changes and effects of bilingualism will be analyzed and related to the other realms of the person’s life. To examine the economic effect of bilingualism, references to Breton’s Economic Approaches to Language and Bilingualism, New Canadian Perspectives, and Xiong and Shao’s On the Economic Approach to Bilingual Education in China will be further examined as to show how bilingualism affects one’s economic status and what the costs and incentives are of bilingualism. These will also be used to decipher the burden of bilingualism and where it falls based upon one’s economic power and structure. Finally to analyze how bilingual individuals identify within a society and how they consider themselves within their society or country, references to Canli’s All in All, I Am Bilingual, A Study of Bilingualism and Montrul’s Incomplete Acquisition in Bilingualism : Re-examining the Age Factor will be examined as to better understand the stance of bilingual individuals and how they approach their lives and problems from multiple perspectives. These works and more will help to further the understanding around guiding questions of how being bilingual affects a person in these three specific realms, who has the burden of being bilingual and what controls this, how does being bilingual affect someone’s reasoning, processing and problem solving, and how should bilingualism be integrated and approached within society.

College and Major available

Chemistry

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

Comments

Thomas More Honors Program capstone.

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Apr 20th, 2:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:00 PM

A Look at Modern Day Bilingualism

Panel H: University Commons UC 105

Bilingualism is a fascinating phenomenon that can affect many different aspects of a person’s life. By mastering and being fluent in at least two languages, untold opportunities, changes, and perspectives can be learned and further explored. Experiencing life in two languages can almost be like experiencing two different worlds or seeing things from multiple perspectives. People become bilingual for a variety of factors such as assimilation, integration, higher education, or through their profession. Becoming bilingual can affect not only the person’s life, but also their own physiology and neurological activity, economic and social standing, and cultural and historical perception. Such specific factors will be the focus of this study as to how bilingualism affects one’s life. Taking reference from such works as Vega-Mendoza et al’s The impact of late, non-balanced bilingualism on cognitive performance and Gasquoine’s Effects of Bilingualism on Vocabulary, Executive Functions, Age of Dementia Onset, and Regional Brain Structure, the neurological changes and effects of bilingualism will be analyzed and related to the other realms of the person’s life. To examine the economic effect of bilingualism, references to Breton’s Economic Approaches to Language and Bilingualism, New Canadian Perspectives, and Xiong and Shao’s On the Economic Approach to Bilingual Education in China will be further examined as to show how bilingualism affects one’s economic status and what the costs and incentives are of bilingualism. These will also be used to decipher the burden of bilingualism and where it falls based upon one’s economic power and structure. Finally to analyze how bilingual individuals identify within a society and how they consider themselves within their society or country, references to Canli’s All in All, I Am Bilingual, A Study of Bilingualism and Montrul’s Incomplete Acquisition in Bilingualism : Re-examining the Age Factor will be examined as to better understand the stance of bilingual individuals and how they approach their lives and problems from multiple perspectives. These works and more will help to further the understanding around guiding questions of how being bilingual affects a person in these three specific realms, who has the burden of being bilingual and what controls this, how does being bilingual affect someone’s reasoning, processing and problem solving, and how should bilingualism be integrated and approached within society.

 

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