First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Nicholas M. Faulise, Sacred Heart UniversityFollow

Participation Type

Paper Talk

Mentor/s

Dr. Jennifer Mattei

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Location

Panel H: University Commons UC 105

Start Day/Time

4-20-2018 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-20-2018 3:00 PM

Abstract

Coastal areas provide a variety of ecosystem services such as wave attenuation, wind breaking, and serving as habitat for a number of species (Davis et al. 2015). However, many of these areas have been degraded and destabilized due to human activity. Rising sea levels and increases in storm frequency and intensity threaten many regions, and have the potential to cause a substantial amount of property damage. Methods such as the installation of sea walls can alleviate some of these concerns, but they do not provide all the benefits that a natural shoreline can. Living shorelines, which refer to green and environmentally friendly infrastructure techniques, may serve as a better alternative due to their proven benefits ((Buccino et al. 2013). This paper examines the methods utilized to create a living shoreline and its impacts on habitat formation at Stratford Point. We found that Spartina alternoflora seagrasses were able to successfully grow and help establish a low marsh. Reef Balls were found to serve as habitat for oysters, and also did not appear to impact the spawning of Horseshoe Crabs. The methods utilized here serve as a model for future restoration efforts and showcase the positive impacts a Living Shoreline can have on coastal stability.

College and Major available

Biology

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 2:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:00 PM

Restoration Efforts at Stratford Point: The Development of a Living Shoreline

Panel H: University Commons UC 105

Coastal areas provide a variety of ecosystem services such as wave attenuation, wind breaking, and serving as habitat for a number of species (Davis et al. 2015). However, many of these areas have been degraded and destabilized due to human activity. Rising sea levels and increases in storm frequency and intensity threaten many regions, and have the potential to cause a substantial amount of property damage. Methods such as the installation of sea walls can alleviate some of these concerns, but they do not provide all the benefits that a natural shoreline can. Living shorelines, which refer to green and environmentally friendly infrastructure techniques, may serve as a better alternative due to their proven benefits ((Buccino et al. 2013). This paper examines the methods utilized to create a living shoreline and its impacts on habitat formation at Stratford Point. We found that Spartina alternoflora seagrasses were able to successfully grow and help establish a low marsh. Reef Balls were found to serve as habitat for oysters, and also did not appear to impact the spawning of Horseshoe Crabs. The methods utilized here serve as a model for future restoration efforts and showcase the positive impacts a Living Shoreline can have on coastal stability.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.