Participation Type

Poster

Mentor/s

Dr. Deirdre Yeater

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-20-2018 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-20-2018 3:00 PM

Abstract

Cetaceans are known for developing social relationships with each other by displaying various social and contact behaviors. Few studies have investigated the social interactions and types of contact behavior between belugas (Delphinapterus leucas). The present study focused on the frequencies of many social behaviors observed among four belugas (three males and one female) in the care of humans and the changes in behavior over an extended period of time. Continuous data were collection via video recordings over a four year period and were coded for social interactions. Preliminary analysis revealed that Male C was the most likely to initiate social interactions in this social group. It appears that the social interactions among the individuals may be somewhat stable over time. The findings of this study have implications for better understanding beluga social interactions of whales that are living under managed care.

College and Major available

Psychology

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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Apr 20th, 1:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:00 PM

Beluga Whales Socio-Sexual Interactions and Behaviors (Delphinapterus leucas)

University Commons

Cetaceans are known for developing social relationships with each other by displaying various social and contact behaviors. Few studies have investigated the social interactions and types of contact behavior between belugas (Delphinapterus leucas). The present study focused on the frequencies of many social behaviors observed among four belugas (three males and one female) in the care of humans and the changes in behavior over an extended period of time. Continuous data were collection via video recordings over a four year period and were coded for social interactions. Preliminary analysis revealed that Male C was the most likely to initiate social interactions in this social group. It appears that the social interactions among the individuals may be somewhat stable over time. The findings of this study have implications for better understanding beluga social interactions of whales that are living under managed care.

 

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