First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Tyler LascolaFollow

Participation Type

Paper Talk

Final Title of Poster or Paper

The Tender Turn: Ambivalence toward Brunetto Latini and Homosexuality in Inferno XV

Mentor/s

Dr. June-Ann Greeley Prof. Joseph Nagy

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Location

Panel H: Academic Building HC 110

Start Day/Time

4-24-2019 12:30 PM

End Day/Time

4-24-2019 1:45 PM

Abstract

This essay treats the ambiguity and conflicting moods present during Dante the pilgrim’s encounter with his old mentor, Brunetto Latini, who appears to have been sent to hell for being homosexual. This passage has been notoriously difficult to comprehensively explicate, such that even today discourse persists over Brunetto’s sin and Dante’s implications regarding it. From the end of Canto XIV through Canto XVI, the poet becomes especially ambiguous in his verse, and not just about the nature of the sin being punished here, but also regarding his own feelings on the matter. In light of these issues, I propose that Dante’s heightened ambiguity and lack of explanation in this canto could be representative of his own ambivalent views on the nature of homosexuality, particularly as they apply to Brunetto, and that Canto XV may be designed to stimulate readers into critically considering their own attitudes toward homosexuality.

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Apr 24th, 12:30 PM Apr 24th, 1:45 PM

The Tender Turn: Ambivalence toward Brunetto Latini and Homosexuality in Inferno XV

Panel H: Academic Building HC 110

This essay treats the ambiguity and conflicting moods present during Dante the pilgrim’s encounter with his old mentor, Brunetto Latini, who appears to have been sent to hell for being homosexual. This passage has been notoriously difficult to comprehensively explicate, such that even today discourse persists over Brunetto’s sin and Dante’s implications regarding it. From the end of Canto XIV through Canto XVI, the poet becomes especially ambiguous in his verse, and not just about the nature of the sin being punished here, but also regarding his own feelings on the matter. In light of these issues, I propose that Dante’s heightened ambiguity and lack of explanation in this canto could be representative of his own ambivalent views on the nature of homosexuality, particularly as they apply to Brunetto, and that Canto XV may be designed to stimulate readers into critically considering their own attitudes toward homosexuality.