First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Ashley DriscollFollow

Mentor/s

Professor Mark Jacob

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA stores all of the genetic information that is unique to each individual. Scientists have long since discovered DNA, however without the proper technology it has been of little use in forensic analysis. In 1970 the first method of DNA sequencing had been developed which had great promise amongst many fields including biology, psychology, and even forensics. Specifically, with respect to the criminal justice system investigators now had the ability to accurately convict guilty criminals as well as to exonerate those who have been wrongfully convicted. Although DNA sequencing is very commonly used across many different disciplines, I will specifically take into consideration important cases including the Colin Pitchfork case, Kirk Bloodsworth’s exoneration, as well as the Commonwealth versus Tassone. This paper will first discuss the different types of DNA sequencing technology that is available to forensic analysts and explain the science behind them. I will also discuss the importance of having DNA databanks and how they have proven to be useful, specifically taking into account the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS). Additionally, I will discuss the difference between admissible and inadmissible evidence with respect to DNA sequencing and how it can actually be used in the courtroom.

College and Major available

Criminal Justice

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-24-2019 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-24-2019 5:00 PM

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Apr 24th, 2:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

The Evolution of the Criminal Justice System through DNA Sequencing

University Commons

Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA stores all of the genetic information that is unique to each individual. Scientists have long since discovered DNA, however without the proper technology it has been of little use in forensic analysis. In 1970 the first method of DNA sequencing had been developed which had great promise amongst many fields including biology, psychology, and even forensics. Specifically, with respect to the criminal justice system investigators now had the ability to accurately convict guilty criminals as well as to exonerate those who have been wrongfully convicted. Although DNA sequencing is very commonly used across many different disciplines, I will specifically take into consideration important cases including the Colin Pitchfork case, Kirk Bloodsworth’s exoneration, as well as the Commonwealth versus Tassone. This paper will first discuss the different types of DNA sequencing technology that is available to forensic analysts and explain the science behind them. I will also discuss the importance of having DNA databanks and how they have proven to be useful, specifically taking into account the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS). Additionally, I will discuss the difference between admissible and inadmissible evidence with respect to DNA sequencing and how it can actually be used in the courtroom.

 

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