First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Nicole LongoFollow

Participation Type

Poster

Final Title of Poster or Paper

Comparison of Planktonic Microbial Diversity in Two Watersheds on the Dingle Peninsula

Mentor/s

Dr. Kirk Bartholomew

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-24-2019 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-24-2019 5:00 PM

Abstract

Anthropogenic impacts on water quality in coastal ecosystems is of increasing concern given current land-use and population patterns. In particular, sustainable development in areas of high population/tourism pressure in coastal watersheds is of concern and demands an understanding of the complex relationships between the “natural” and “human” systems affecting the ecosystem. Two adjacent watersheds on the Dingle Peninsula in Ireland (Dingle and Ballyferriter) provide an interesting opportunity to separate the effects of natural/agricultural impacts (Balleyferriter) vs. natural/agricultural/tourism (Dingle) effects on water quality in the primary river systems draining the two watersheds. As part of a larger effort to conduct a thorough environment assessment of the two watersheds, we have completed an initial 16S rRNA community profile of the planktonic microbial communities in the Milltown (Dingle) and Feohanagh (Ballyferriter) rivers. Our data indicate substantial and significant differences both within and between sample sites in the different river systems. In addition, instances of clear relationships between microbial community composition and both stream level classification/surrounding terrestrial habitat are apparent.

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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Apr 24th, 2:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

Comparison of Planktonic Microbial Diversity in Two Watersheds on the Dingle Peninsula

University Commons

Anthropogenic impacts on water quality in coastal ecosystems is of increasing concern given current land-use and population patterns. In particular, sustainable development in areas of high population/tourism pressure in coastal watersheds is of concern and demands an understanding of the complex relationships between the “natural” and “human” systems affecting the ecosystem. Two adjacent watersheds on the Dingle Peninsula in Ireland (Dingle and Ballyferriter) provide an interesting opportunity to separate the effects of natural/agricultural impacts (Balleyferriter) vs. natural/agricultural/tourism (Dingle) effects on water quality in the primary river systems draining the two watersheds. As part of a larger effort to conduct a thorough environment assessment of the two watersheds, we have completed an initial 16S rRNA community profile of the planktonic microbial communities in the Milltown (Dingle) and Feohanagh (Ballyferriter) rivers. Our data indicate substantial and significant differences both within and between sample sites in the different river systems. In addition, instances of clear relationships between microbial community composition and both stream level classification/surrounding terrestrial habitat are apparent.