First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Madison BradleyFollow
Fabiana PersicFollow
Ryan SledzikFollow

Participation Type

Poster

Mentor/s

Dr. Deirdre Yeater and Dr. Dawn Melzer

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-24-2019 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-24-2019 5:00 PM

Abstract

Cetaceans, like bottlenose dolphins, are well known for their complex and highly developed cognitive capacities. Earlier research demonstrated these dolphin’s abilities to perform creative novel behaviors but the degree of creativity for the behaviors produced was not assessed. For this study, we adapted tests of human creativity to investigate creativity in 12 bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in managed care. The data were analyzed for fluency of behavioral responses. After 4 test sessions, the results indicated that the dolphins performed different behaviors for 45.6% of trials. On average, the dolphins performed 18.88 different behaviors whether they received reinforcement or not during a session and tended to perform more behaviors in a row before repeating behaviors as sessions progressed. Taken together, these results suggest that dolphins seem to show fluency in their creativity when under stimulus control.

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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
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Apr 24th, 2:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

Assessing creativity in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in a controlled setting

University Commons

Cetaceans, like bottlenose dolphins, are well known for their complex and highly developed cognitive capacities. Earlier research demonstrated these dolphin’s abilities to perform creative novel behaviors but the degree of creativity for the behaviors produced was not assessed. For this study, we adapted tests of human creativity to investigate creativity in 12 bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in managed care. The data were analyzed for fluency of behavioral responses. After 4 test sessions, the results indicated that the dolphins performed different behaviors for 45.6% of trials. On average, the dolphins performed 18.88 different behaviors whether they received reinforcement or not during a session and tended to perform more behaviors in a row before repeating behaviors as sessions progressed. Taken together, these results suggest that dolphins seem to show fluency in their creativity when under stimulus control.