First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Joseph GiacomoFollow
Abigail BayzathFollow

Mentor/s

Professor Julie K. Nolan Professor Stevie H. Clines

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Clinical Scenario: A concussion is a relatively common pathology that occurs in individuals of all ages. If a previous concussion is treated incorrectly, it can lead to serious consequences, such as postural stability deficits. There’s discrepancy regarding clinical diagnostic tests, which serve as a valid and reliable tool to capture long-term postural stability deficits in those with a previous medical history (PMH) of concussion. Focused Clinical Question: Does a PMH of concussion correlate with long-term changes in postural stability post-concussion? Summary of Key Findings: After a thorough literature search, 3 studies were included that were relevant to the clinical question: 1 prospective cohort, 1 cross-sectional, and 1 prospective observational study. These 3 studies examined the repercussions post mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Two studies used a clinical force plate to explore various center of pressure (COP) variables, while one study utilized inertial sensors to quantify single and dual-task gait variables. Two studies found that a history of mTBI demonstrated larger, slower, and more random body sway, as well as smaller and slower stride lengths during dual gait tasks. However, one study concluded that postural control deficits are transient in nature. Clinical Bottom Line: Balance deficits post-acute concussion remain longer than the formerly thought 3-5 day time period. When making decisions regarding return to play and recovery, clinicians should be aware that deficits can last two weeks or more post-concussion; however, there is no definitive time table in regard to how long these deficits last, and when they occur. Strength of Recommendation: Level B evidence exists to support long-term postural stability deficits in the general population with a PMH of concussion.

Key words: postural stability, balance deficits, concussion

College and Major available

College of Health Professions, Athletic Training

Location

University Commons

Start Day/Time

4-24-2019 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-24-2019 5:00 PM

Students' Information

Joseph Giacomo: B.S. Athletic Training Major

Abigail Bayzath: B.S. Athletic Training Major

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Apr 24th, 2:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

Long-Term Postural Stability Deficits from Chronic Concussion Exposure

University Commons

Clinical Scenario: A concussion is a relatively common pathology that occurs in individuals of all ages. If a previous concussion is treated incorrectly, it can lead to serious consequences, such as postural stability deficits. There’s discrepancy regarding clinical diagnostic tests, which serve as a valid and reliable tool to capture long-term postural stability deficits in those with a previous medical history (PMH) of concussion. Focused Clinical Question: Does a PMH of concussion correlate with long-term changes in postural stability post-concussion? Summary of Key Findings: After a thorough literature search, 3 studies were included that were relevant to the clinical question: 1 prospective cohort, 1 cross-sectional, and 1 prospective observational study. These 3 studies examined the repercussions post mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Two studies used a clinical force plate to explore various center of pressure (COP) variables, while one study utilized inertial sensors to quantify single and dual-task gait variables. Two studies found that a history of mTBI demonstrated larger, slower, and more random body sway, as well as smaller and slower stride lengths during dual gait tasks. However, one study concluded that postural control deficits are transient in nature. Clinical Bottom Line: Balance deficits post-acute concussion remain longer than the formerly thought 3-5 day time period. When making decisions regarding return to play and recovery, clinicians should be aware that deficits can last two weeks or more post-concussion; however, there is no definitive time table in regard to how long these deficits last, and when they occur. Strength of Recommendation: Level B evidence exists to support long-term postural stability deficits in the general population with a PMH of concussion.

Key words: postural stability, balance deficits, concussion