Title of Poster or Paper

Limb Evolvability in Pan Troglodytes

Mentor/s

Kristen R. R. Savell

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

In primates, trait covariance is common among limb segments and bony structures. Trait covariance signifies the changes in one trait that may influence the development and/or evolution of another trait. Evolvability - or the ability for a trait to respond to evolutionary pressures - is affected by trait covariance. Covarying traits may limit a trait’s ability to respond to selective pressures, and that traits with high covariance have high integration and low evolvability.

In this study, we estimate measures of evolvability (evolvability, responsibility, integration, and autonomy) of limb segments of common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We hypothesize that the covariance between the humerus, femur, and tibia will follow established patterns for great apes and that the humerus will be less integrated than the femur or tibia. After controlling for sex, results support our hypothesis: that the covariance pattern is as expected and that the humerus is less integrated (and therefore less evolvable) than the bones of the lower limb.

College and Major available

Biology

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

390K, Kristen R. R. Savell

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

4-24-2020 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-24-2020 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Kathleen Quinn, honor student, biology major, graduation: 2020

Amanda Woodbury, biology major, graduation: 2020

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Apr 24th, 2:00 PM Apr 24th, 4:00 PM

Limb Evolvability in Pan Troglodytes

Digital Commons

In primates, trait covariance is common among limb segments and bony structures. Trait covariance signifies the changes in one trait that may influence the development and/or evolution of another trait. Evolvability - or the ability for a trait to respond to evolutionary pressures - is affected by trait covariance. Covarying traits may limit a trait’s ability to respond to selective pressures, and that traits with high covariance have high integration and low evolvability.

In this study, we estimate measures of evolvability (evolvability, responsibility, integration, and autonomy) of limb segments of common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We hypothesize that the covariance between the humerus, femur, and tibia will follow established patterns for great apes and that the humerus will be less integrated than the femur or tibia. After controlling for sex, results support our hypothesis: that the covariance pattern is as expected and that the humerus is less integrated (and therefore less evolvable) than the bones of the lower limb.

 

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