First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Kylee HarveyFollow

Mentor/s

Professor David Thomson and Professor Jessica Trudeau

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Individuals with mental illnesses are overrepresented in the United States’ criminal justice system. Consequently, this overrepresentation creates problems for the correctional system that translates into problems within society as well. The environment of the correctional system, in which treatment and rehabilitation are not a high priority, is not suitable for the mentally ill and creates further complications for such individuals. Lack of community-based support for the mentally ill as a result of deinstitutionalization commonly leads to a repeated cycle of incarceration, release, and rearrest often referred to as the “revolving door” phenomenon. Jail diversion strategies, which seek to divert the mentally ill from the criminal justice system, properly evaluate mental disorders and advocate for alternative charges or relocation. However, these jail diversion strategies have proven to be relatively inefficient in reducing criminal recidivism among the mentally ill. Instead, mental health and criminal justice professionals must collaborate their efforts to both evaluate and treat mental illness as well as utilize ethical correctional strategies in order to prevent the revolving door of the mentally ill within the criminal justice system.

College and Major available

English

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

HN-300-E, Professor David Thomson and Professor Jessica Trudeau

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

4-24-2020 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-24-2020 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Kylee Harvey: English Major, Political Science/Honors Minor, Honors Student, Graduation Year 2021

Comments

This poster is accompanied by a narrated presentation (see Additional file)

Capstone.mp4 (15562 kB)

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Apr 24th, 2:00 PM Apr 24th, 4:00 PM

Closing the Revolving Door: Mental Illness Within the Criminal Justice System

Digital Commons

Individuals with mental illnesses are overrepresented in the United States’ criminal justice system. Consequently, this overrepresentation creates problems for the correctional system that translates into problems within society as well. The environment of the correctional system, in which treatment and rehabilitation are not a high priority, is not suitable for the mentally ill and creates further complications for such individuals. Lack of community-based support for the mentally ill as a result of deinstitutionalization commonly leads to a repeated cycle of incarceration, release, and rearrest often referred to as the “revolving door” phenomenon. Jail diversion strategies, which seek to divert the mentally ill from the criminal justice system, properly evaluate mental disorders and advocate for alternative charges or relocation. However, these jail diversion strategies have proven to be relatively inefficient in reducing criminal recidivism among the mentally ill. Instead, mental health and criminal justice professionals must collaborate their efforts to both evaluate and treat mental illness as well as utilize ethical correctional strategies in order to prevent the revolving door of the mentally ill within the criminal justice system.

 

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