First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Danielle ManninoFollow

Mentor/s

Professor Matthew F. Moran

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

An increased running step rate (i.e., cadence) can decrease lower extremity joint loads and potentially reduce running-related injury (RRI) risk. Many gait interventions have significantly increased a runner’s cadence through a variety of external stimuli (e.g., metronome). Runners have been shown to spontaneously manipulate their cadence when listening to music with a tempo that differed ±3% from their baseline cadence. However, no study has determined whether a runner will subconsciously increase cadence > 3% when listening to up-tempo music. PURPOSE: To determine if music tempo (beats per minute, bpm) set 10% higher than baseline cadence affects spatiotemporal running mechanics. METHODS: Utilizing a blinded experimental design, twenty-two runners (15F, 7M, 18-40 yo) were recruited, granted informed consent, were randomly assigned to a control (C) or experimental (E) group, and picked four motivational songs. The Brunel Music Rating Inventory was used to rate song motivational level. Subjects ran three 5-min trials (5/10 effort) on a pressure-sensitive treadmill (Noraxon U.S.A., 100 Hz) with vertical ground reaction force and pressure recorded during the last 45 sec and lowpass filtered (40 Hz). Five-min of rest was given between trials. During the second trial, subjects listened to music via headphones with the bpm set to baseline cadence (C) or 10% higher (E). Music was administered via a novel smartphone application that permitted song tempo to be adjusted and maintained in one bpm increments. The last trial was completed without music with velocity held constant across all trials. A mixed design analysis of variance was run in JASP with a significance set apriori at 0.05. RESULTS: Baseline cadence was not significantly different between groups (C: 165.4±9.5 steps per minute, E 167.2±6.8, p=0.61). There was not a significant main effect (p=0.54, p=0.32, p=0.152, p=0.70) of music tempo between groups for cadence (F (1,20)=0.39), step width (F(1,20)=1.02), stance phase (F (1,20)=2.22), or foot rotation (F(1,20)=0.16). CONCLUSION: Spatiotemporal running mechanics do not spontaneously adjust when runners listen to motivational music set at a tempo 10% greater than baseline cadence. Listening to up-tempo music should not be considered an effective external stimulus to promote increased running cadence.

College and Major available

College of Health Professions, Exercise Science UG

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

EX-398; Matthew Moran

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

4-24-2020 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-24-2020 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Danielle Mannino, Major Exercise Science, Minor Psychology, Class of 2020.

Winner, Dean's Prize: College of Health Professions. Honorable Mention, Most Creative 2020 award.

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Apr 24th, 2:00 PM Apr 24th, 4:00 PM

Influence of A Novel Music App on Spatiotemporal Mechanics During Running

Digital Commons

An increased running step rate (i.e., cadence) can decrease lower extremity joint loads and potentially reduce running-related injury (RRI) risk. Many gait interventions have significantly increased a runner’s cadence through a variety of external stimuli (e.g., metronome). Runners have been shown to spontaneously manipulate their cadence when listening to music with a tempo that differed ±3% from their baseline cadence. However, no study has determined whether a runner will subconsciously increase cadence > 3% when listening to up-tempo music. PURPOSE: To determine if music tempo (beats per minute, bpm) set 10% higher than baseline cadence affects spatiotemporal running mechanics. METHODS: Utilizing a blinded experimental design, twenty-two runners (15F, 7M, 18-40 yo) were recruited, granted informed consent, were randomly assigned to a control (C) or experimental (E) group, and picked four motivational songs. The Brunel Music Rating Inventory was used to rate song motivational level. Subjects ran three 5-min trials (5/10 effort) on a pressure-sensitive treadmill (Noraxon U.S.A., 100 Hz) with vertical ground reaction force and pressure recorded during the last 45 sec and lowpass filtered (40 Hz). Five-min of rest was given between trials. During the second trial, subjects listened to music via headphones with the bpm set to baseline cadence (C) or 10% higher (E). Music was administered via a novel smartphone application that permitted song tempo to be adjusted and maintained in one bpm increments. The last trial was completed without music with velocity held constant across all trials. A mixed design analysis of variance was run in JASP with a significance set apriori at 0.05. RESULTS: Baseline cadence was not significantly different between groups (C: 165.4±9.5 steps per minute, E 167.2±6.8, p=0.61). There was not a significant main effect (p=0.54, p=0.32, p=0.152, p=0.70) of music tempo between groups for cadence (F (1,20)=0.39), step width (F(1,20)=1.02), stance phase (F (1,20)=2.22), or foot rotation (F(1,20)=0.16). CONCLUSION: Spatiotemporal running mechanics do not spontaneously adjust when runners listen to motivational music set at a tempo 10% greater than baseline cadence. Listening to up-tempo music should not be considered an effective external stimulus to promote increased running cadence.