First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Rianna McNameeFollow

Mentor/s

Professor Thomas Terleph

Participation Type

Paper Talk

Abstract

Hormonal contraception is still not commercially available to men even though pharmacological mechanisms used for inhibiting spermatogenesis have been adapted through the use of androgen and progestin therapy, which is the same pharmacological mechanism used to inhibit fertility in women (Grimes et. al. 1999). This paper details the similarities and differences of the implications of these pharmacological mechanisms in the male and female bodies, as well as analyzes the sociologically contrived perception of reproductive responsibility in women in comparison to men. It is concluded here that sociological rather than physiological limitations are to blame for the lack of commercial availability of a male hormonal contraception, and that the availability of male hormonal contraception will aide in equalizing the reproductive responsibility of men and women.

College and Major available

Biology

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

BI-399

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

4-24-2020 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-24-2020 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Rianna McNamee, Neuroscience major, Honors Student, Class of 2020.

Winner, Best Multidisciplinary Research or Collaboration 2020 award.

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Apr 24th, 2:00 PM Apr 24th, 4:00 PM

The Biological and Sociological Mechanisms Affecting the Development of Male Hormonal Contraception

Digital Commons

Hormonal contraception is still not commercially available to men even though pharmacological mechanisms used for inhibiting spermatogenesis have been adapted through the use of androgen and progestin therapy, which is the same pharmacological mechanism used to inhibit fertility in women (Grimes et. al. 1999). This paper details the similarities and differences of the implications of these pharmacological mechanisms in the male and female bodies, as well as analyzes the sociologically contrived perception of reproductive responsibility in women in comparison to men. It is concluded here that sociological rather than physiological limitations are to blame for the lack of commercial availability of a male hormonal contraception, and that the availability of male hormonal contraception will aide in equalizing the reproductive responsibility of men and women.

 

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