First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Jacqueline NoftleFollow

Mentor/s

Professor Joshua Lander & Professor Matthew Moran

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Background:There is a general consensus in the literature that exercise in several forms is beneficial for individuals with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) patients. There are multiple factors that may determine exercise behavior in this population. This study focuses on three questions: Is exercise recommended as a primary treatment of PD by physicians? Are exercise facilities accessible? Do individuals have a support system to carry out exercise programs?

Objective:The purpose of this study is to determine if PD patients are prescribed exercise by their primary care physician, evaluate barriers PD patients endure in order to complete exercise prescriptions, and determine PD patient’s support system needed to maintain exercise.

Methods: Six PD patients participated in the study. Each participant completed a survey that included a series of questions about their exercise prescription, exercise behavior, barriers to exercise, and support structure.

Results:Trends were deduced from survey responses. Fifty percent (50%) of the participants were not given specific recommendations for exercise in general, 67% of the participants were not given specific recommendations for exercise duration, and 50% of the participants reported no specific exercise mode recommendations. Sixty-seven percent (67%) of the participants were not referred to an exercise professional. Eighty-three percent (83%) report support from their family member or spouse. Sixty-seven percent (67%) reported that understanding the benefits of exercise for PD patients may help for maintenance of an exercise routine. 50% of participants report that they are unsure what exercises to do.

Observations: According to our preliminary data, only half of our subjects received exercise recommendation from their physicians. Half of our study population reported difficulty with exercise selection. Participants reported high family support and exercise accessibility, yet, seek education for specific exercise recommendations, guidance and sources of motivation. There appears to be a need for exercise education and guidance for individuals with PD.

College and Major available

Exercise Science UG

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

Independent Research in Exercise Science, EX 398-IB, Dr. Lander

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

4-24-2020 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-24-2020 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Jacqueline Noftle, Exercise Science, Class of 2020.

Honorable Mention, Most Scholarly Impact or Potential 2020 award.

Comments

This is a narrated presentation (approximately 6 min., 48 sec.)

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Apr 24th, 2:00 PM Apr 24th, 4:00 PM

Exercise Prescription and Behavior in People with Parkinson's Disease

Digital Commons

Background:There is a general consensus in the literature that exercise in several forms is beneficial for individuals with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) patients. There are multiple factors that may determine exercise behavior in this population. This study focuses on three questions: Is exercise recommended as a primary treatment of PD by physicians? Are exercise facilities accessible? Do individuals have a support system to carry out exercise programs?

Objective:The purpose of this study is to determine if PD patients are prescribed exercise by their primary care physician, evaluate barriers PD patients endure in order to complete exercise prescriptions, and determine PD patient’s support system needed to maintain exercise.

Methods: Six PD patients participated in the study. Each participant completed a survey that included a series of questions about their exercise prescription, exercise behavior, barriers to exercise, and support structure.

Results:Trends were deduced from survey responses. Fifty percent (50%) of the participants were not given specific recommendations for exercise in general, 67% of the participants were not given specific recommendations for exercise duration, and 50% of the participants reported no specific exercise mode recommendations. Sixty-seven percent (67%) of the participants were not referred to an exercise professional. Eighty-three percent (83%) report support from their family member or spouse. Sixty-seven percent (67%) reported that understanding the benefits of exercise for PD patients may help for maintenance of an exercise routine. 50% of participants report that they are unsure what exercises to do.

Observations: According to our preliminary data, only half of our subjects received exercise recommendation from their physicians. Half of our study population reported difficulty with exercise selection. Participants reported high family support and exercise accessibility, yet, seek education for specific exercise recommendations, guidance and sources of motivation. There appears to be a need for exercise education and guidance for individuals with PD.