First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Emily PetroFollow

Mentor/s

Dr. Suzanne Deschenes Dr. Brian Stiltner

Participation Type

Paper Talk

Abstract

In the world of athletics, concussions are unfortunately being endured more frequently than ever regardless of skill level, gender, or age. A mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), more commonly referred to as a concussion, is defined as a transient neurological disturbance of the brain induced by some traumatic force.1 In recent years, participation in athletics has resulted in a staggering 1.6 to 3.8 million annual concussion cases.2 Once an athlete gets their first concussion, the likelihood of them getting a second concussion increases 3-fold.3 Concussion research thus far has focused mainly on the consequences of neurophysiological function, however, there is evidence and numerous investigations that suggest that concussions are a multidimensional injury that impact neurophysiological processes as well as body movement control.2 Taking this into consideration raises the question of whether or not athletes are at an increased risk of musculoskeletal injury after they recover from a concussion.

College and Major available

Exercise Science UG

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

HN-300

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

4-24-2020 2:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-24-2020 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Emily Petro, Exercise Science Major, Honors Student, Graduation year: 2020

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Apr 24th, 2:00 PM Apr 24th, 4:00 PM

Early Sport Specialization and Its Negative Effects Compared to Sport Sampling

Digital Commons

In the world of athletics, concussions are unfortunately being endured more frequently than ever regardless of skill level, gender, or age. A mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), more commonly referred to as a concussion, is defined as a transient neurological disturbance of the brain induced by some traumatic force.1 In recent years, participation in athletics has resulted in a staggering 1.6 to 3.8 million annual concussion cases.2 Once an athlete gets their first concussion, the likelihood of them getting a second concussion increases 3-fold.3 Concussion research thus far has focused mainly on the consequences of neurophysiological function, however, there is evidence and numerous investigations that suggest that concussions are a multidimensional injury that impact neurophysiological processes as well as body movement control.2 Taking this into consideration raises the question of whether or not athletes are at an increased risk of musculoskeletal injury after they recover from a concussion.

 

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