First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Jeremy MillerFollow

Mentor/s

Stephanie Clines

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Background: Shoulder disorders are common in wheelchair athletes due to an increased load and repetitive stress that is needed for handling a wheelchair. Current data suggest higher rates of shoulder injury in overhead wheelchair athletes. Focused Clinical Question: Does implementing a shoulder strengthening program reduce the prevalence of shoulder pain in wheelchair basketball athletes? Clinical Bottom Line: There is currently inconsistent, high-quality evidence demonstrating that a shoulder strengthening intervention may decrease the prevalence in wheelchair basketball athletes compared to not using a shoulder strengthening program. Future research should further examine (a) what specific muscle groups are lacking in strength when an individual is bound to a wheelchair; and (b) which muscles are compensating for the muscular imbalance within the shoulder girdle to help prevent the prevalence of shoulder pain within the wheelchair basketball athlete.

College and Major available

Athletic Training

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

Masters Capstone Completion AT-699, Stephanie Clines

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

5-5-2021 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

5-5-2021 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Jeremy Miller, Master's of Science in Athletic Training, May 2021

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May 5th, 1:00 PM May 5th, 4:00 PM

The Effectiveness of a Shoulder Strengthening Program to Reduce the Prevalence of Shoulder Pain in Wheelchair Basketball Athletes: A Critically Appraised Topic

Digital Commons

Background: Shoulder disorders are common in wheelchair athletes due to an increased load and repetitive stress that is needed for handling a wheelchair. Current data suggest higher rates of shoulder injury in overhead wheelchair athletes. Focused Clinical Question: Does implementing a shoulder strengthening program reduce the prevalence of shoulder pain in wheelchair basketball athletes? Clinical Bottom Line: There is currently inconsistent, high-quality evidence demonstrating that a shoulder strengthening intervention may decrease the prevalence in wheelchair basketball athletes compared to not using a shoulder strengthening program. Future research should further examine (a) what specific muscle groups are lacking in strength when an individual is bound to a wheelchair; and (b) which muscles are compensating for the muscular imbalance within the shoulder girdle to help prevent the prevalence of shoulder pain within the wheelchair basketball athlete.

 

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