First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Chenchen CuiFollow

Title of Poster or Paper

Does Smell Loss Influence Cognition?

Mentor/s

Dr. Rui Liu Health Science Department Faculty Member Assistant Professor liur3@sacredheart.edu

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Cognition is essential for regulating day-to-day living. People rely on their cognitions to acquire, process and understand information. Cognition involves both conscious and unconscious thinking. It comprises a series of mental activities, including memory, learning, attention, reasoning, language, judging, and decision making. As the aging population continues to grow, more older adults are at risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Therefore, it is essential to identify potentially easy and cost-effective ways to detect early signs of cognitive decline. There is a growing body of literature showing a potential relationship between smell loss and cognitive impairment. Several short odor identification assessments explored in research settings show good validity and reliability in measuring olfactory functioning in elderly populations. The purpose of the current study is to review the current literature examining the relationship between olfactory dysfunction and the risk of cognitive decline among older adults. The present literature review will help guide a future population-based longitudinal study on a similar research topic currently under planning. Knowledge about how olfactory impairment might impact cognition may help healthcare professionals detect early signs of cognitive decline and develop individualized interventions.

College and Major available

Health Science

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

Special Topics in Health Science, HS-299-IC

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

5-5-2021 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

5-5-2021 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Chenchen Cui

Health Science Major, Class of 2022

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May 5th, 1:00 PM May 5th, 4:00 PM

Does Smell Loss Influence Cognition?

Digital Commons

Cognition is essential for regulating day-to-day living. People rely on their cognitions to acquire, process and understand information. Cognition involves both conscious and unconscious thinking. It comprises a series of mental activities, including memory, learning, attention, reasoning, language, judging, and decision making. As the aging population continues to grow, more older adults are at risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Therefore, it is essential to identify potentially easy and cost-effective ways to detect early signs of cognitive decline. There is a growing body of literature showing a potential relationship between smell loss and cognitive impairment. Several short odor identification assessments explored in research settings show good validity and reliability in measuring olfactory functioning in elderly populations. The purpose of the current study is to review the current literature examining the relationship between olfactory dysfunction and the risk of cognitive decline among older adults. The present literature review will help guide a future population-based longitudinal study on a similar research topic currently under planning. Knowledge about how olfactory impairment might impact cognition may help healthcare professionals detect early signs of cognitive decline and develop individualized interventions.

 

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