First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Keaton MangiFollow

Mentor/s

Stephanie Clines

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to identify if there was a difference in sports related concussion knowledge and attitudes in children in regard to race. Sports related concussions are a common cause of injury among youth athletes within the US. A majority of concussion-risk sport athletes are black and are prone to poorer outcomes for concussions. This population may be at greater risk for neurocognitive impairment.

Methods: A computerized search of databases (PubMed, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, and Google Scholar) was conducted and completed in April 2021. The following search terms were used: High school athlete, race, and knowledge and symptoms. The search of literature produced 43 articles relating to all search terms and parameters. Four articles were then selected that met the inclusion criteria. All articles were critically appraised using the STROBE checklist.

Results: Black athletes had less access to resources such as athletic trainers and private/public insurance compared to white athletes. Black athletes who had access to an athletic trainer scored higher in concussion knowledge compared to black athletes who did not. The majority of black athletes attend lower socioeconomic school systems compared to white athletes. Black athletes scored lower on knowledge and attitudes toward concussions compared to white athletes.

Conclusion: Race does have a significant effect on knowledge and attitudes towards concussions. Black high school athletes are less likely to have sufficient knowledge and positive attitudes towards concussions than white high school athletes. These racial differences are highlighted by lack of access to healthcare services and education.

College and Major available

Athletic Training

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

Masters Capstone Completion AT-699-A, Stephanie Clines

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

5-5-2021 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

5-5-2021 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Keaton Mangi, Masters of Science in Athletic Training, 2021

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May 5th, 1:00 PM May 5th, 4:00 PM

Racial Implications on Concussion Knowledge and Recognition Among Children: A Critically Appraised Topic

Digital Commons

Background: The purpose of this study was to identify if there was a difference in sports related concussion knowledge and attitudes in children in regard to race. Sports related concussions are a common cause of injury among youth athletes within the US. A majority of concussion-risk sport athletes are black and are prone to poorer outcomes for concussions. This population may be at greater risk for neurocognitive impairment.

Methods: A computerized search of databases (PubMed, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, and Google Scholar) was conducted and completed in April 2021. The following search terms were used: High school athlete, race, and knowledge and symptoms. The search of literature produced 43 articles relating to all search terms and parameters. Four articles were then selected that met the inclusion criteria. All articles were critically appraised using the STROBE checklist.

Results: Black athletes had less access to resources such as athletic trainers and private/public insurance compared to white athletes. Black athletes who had access to an athletic trainer scored higher in concussion knowledge compared to black athletes who did not. The majority of black athletes attend lower socioeconomic school systems compared to white athletes. Black athletes scored lower on knowledge and attitudes toward concussions compared to white athletes.

Conclusion: Race does have a significant effect on knowledge and attitudes towards concussions. Black high school athletes are less likely to have sufficient knowledge and positive attitudes towards concussions than white high school athletes. These racial differences are highlighted by lack of access to healthcare services and education.