First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Natalie CicconeFollow

Mentor/s

Stephanie Clines

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Background: Head injuries are responsible for most serious equestrian sports injuries. Education regarding the prevention of head and brain injuries is essential. Reducing the risk of concussions includes preventing injuries from occurring and ensuring effective recognition and management of these injuries.

Methods: Kuhl et al.’s study had ninety-four riders competing, riding, or attending equestrian events at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center in Wellington, Florida, from January to April 2010 were surveyed. Measures of central tendency were utilized to evaluate response patterns. Theadom et al.’s study participants were recruited via advertisements circulated through social media, community presentations and equestrian organizations. Participants were sent a web link to an online questionnaire previously designed for high school athletes and modified to ensure relevance to equestrian activities. The percentage of correct responses per item and a total knowledge score were calculated. Differences in concussion knowledge by age, sex, level of experience and previous history of concussion were explored using t-tests, 95% confidence intervals (CI) and effect sizes.

Results: In Kuhl et al.’s study, almost half of equestrian riders (44%) experienced concussions during their careers. Those riders who suffered a brain injury were likely to return to riding without seeking medical clearance. Almost 40% of riders were never educated regarding concussions, while 15% received education from their trainers. In Theadom et al.’s study, the questionnaire was completed by 1486 participants. Knowledge of what concussion was, how to recognize it and key symptoms (except poor sleep) was high (>80%).

Conclusion: There is currently inconsistent high-quality evidence demonstrating that equestrian athletes with a history of concussion do not have more knowledge about concussions compared to those who do not have a history of concussion.

College and Major available

Athletic Training

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

AT699A, Stephanie Clines

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

5-5-2021 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

5-5-2021 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Natalie Ciccone, Masters in Athletic Training, May 2021

Share

COinS
 
May 5th, 1:00 PM May 5th, 4:00 PM

History and Knowledge of Concussions in Equestrian Athletes: A Critically Appraised Topic

Digital Commons

Background: Head injuries are responsible for most serious equestrian sports injuries. Education regarding the prevention of head and brain injuries is essential. Reducing the risk of concussions includes preventing injuries from occurring and ensuring effective recognition and management of these injuries.

Methods: Kuhl et al.’s study had ninety-four riders competing, riding, or attending equestrian events at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center in Wellington, Florida, from January to April 2010 were surveyed. Measures of central tendency were utilized to evaluate response patterns. Theadom et al.’s study participants were recruited via advertisements circulated through social media, community presentations and equestrian organizations. Participants were sent a web link to an online questionnaire previously designed for high school athletes and modified to ensure relevance to equestrian activities. The percentage of correct responses per item and a total knowledge score were calculated. Differences in concussion knowledge by age, sex, level of experience and previous history of concussion were explored using t-tests, 95% confidence intervals (CI) and effect sizes.

Results: In Kuhl et al.’s study, almost half of equestrian riders (44%) experienced concussions during their careers. Those riders who suffered a brain injury were likely to return to riding without seeking medical clearance. Almost 40% of riders were never educated regarding concussions, while 15% received education from their trainers. In Theadom et al.’s study, the questionnaire was completed by 1486 participants. Knowledge of what concussion was, how to recognize it and key symptoms (except poor sleep) was high (>80%).

Conclusion: There is currently inconsistent high-quality evidence demonstrating that equestrian athletes with a history of concussion do not have more knowledge about concussions compared to those who do not have a history of concussion.