First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Erica ModenaFollow

Title of Poster or Paper

Impact of Preseason Training Load on Soft Tissue Injuries in Athletes leading into Regular Season: A Critically Appraised Topic

Mentor/s

Stephanie Clines

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Purpose: Pre-season training aims to prepare the players physically for the rest of the season. The period is characterized by increase in fitness level and training load, but it can have detrimental effects from intensity and stress associated with their sports, leading to higher risk of injuries. Injury rates have shown to increase gradually through preseason. Prevention of injuries is important to allow for individual and team success. The primary aim was to examine the relationship between training load and incidence of injury during a preseason training.

Methods: Some subjects performed pre-season training over a period of 14 weeks beginning early Dec. to Mid-March. Training sessions ranged from 25 min to 105 min. Another study had players participate in a 6- week training program that consisted of an average of 6 to 8 training sessions and one game per week. Players received a balanced training program with endurance, speed, agility, strength, technical, and tactical aspects that was delivered by a professional coach. In another study, each day a player was involved in a field training session and individual TL was recorded. Individual TL, aerobic fitness, and injury data were collected over a 14-week pre-season. Players completed 3 to 4 training sessions per week.

Results: A total of 20 injuries was recorded during pre-season training period with an overall incidence of injury of 6.9 (95% CI-3.7 -10.1) per 1,000 training hrs. The most common training injury was sustained to the thigh and calf (2.4 per 1000 35%) ankle 15%, knee 15%. In another study, there was a significant difference in overall performance between the two seasons. Statistically there was no significant difference between the two seasons in regards of external and internal training loads. (2737 ± 452 and 2629 ± 786 AU; p = 0.492, d = 0.109, small). In the last study, Training load. Players with pre-season TL (p = 0.014).

Conclusion: The increase of training load over a short duration of time is detrimental to soft tissue injury rates. Gradually increasing high intensity training over a longer periodization, as well as providing a sufficient recovery time between each session will decrease the likelihood of injury5. Monitoring training loads is essential to ensure players receive a gradual increase in training during pre-season 1 . Athletic trainers must ensure these athletes are given adequate recovery between high volume and high intensity sessions.

College and Major available

Athletic Training

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

Master's Capstone Completion AT-699, Stephanie Clines

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

5-5-2021 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

5-5-2021 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Erica Modena

athletic training

2021

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May 5th, 1:00 PM May 5th, 4:00 PM

Impact of Preseason Training Load on Soft Tissue Injuries in Athletes leading into Regular Season: A Critically Appraised Topic

Digital Commons

Purpose: Pre-season training aims to prepare the players physically for the rest of the season. The period is characterized by increase in fitness level and training load, but it can have detrimental effects from intensity and stress associated with their sports, leading to higher risk of injuries. Injury rates have shown to increase gradually through preseason. Prevention of injuries is important to allow for individual and team success. The primary aim was to examine the relationship between training load and incidence of injury during a preseason training.

Methods: Some subjects performed pre-season training over a period of 14 weeks beginning early Dec. to Mid-March. Training sessions ranged from 25 min to 105 min. Another study had players participate in a 6- week training program that consisted of an average of 6 to 8 training sessions and one game per week. Players received a balanced training program with endurance, speed, agility, strength, technical, and tactical aspects that was delivered by a professional coach. In another study, each day a player was involved in a field training session and individual TL was recorded. Individual TL, aerobic fitness, and injury data were collected over a 14-week pre-season. Players completed 3 to 4 training sessions per week.

Results: A total of 20 injuries was recorded during pre-season training period with an overall incidence of injury of 6.9 (95% CI-3.7 -10.1) per 1,000 training hrs. The most common training injury was sustained to the thigh and calf (2.4 per 1000 35%) ankle 15%, knee 15%. In another study, there was a significant difference in overall performance between the two seasons. Statistically there was no significant difference between the two seasons in regards of external and internal training loads. (2737 ± 452 and 2629 ± 786 AU; p = 0.492, d = 0.109, small). In the last study, Training load. Players with pre-season TL (p = 0.014).

Conclusion: The increase of training load over a short duration of time is detrimental to soft tissue injury rates. Gradually increasing high intensity training over a longer periodization, as well as providing a sufficient recovery time between each session will decrease the likelihood of injury5. Monitoring training loads is essential to ensure players receive a gradual increase in training during pre-season 1 . Athletic trainers must ensure these athletes are given adequate recovery between high volume and high intensity sessions.