First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Madison BradleyFollow

Mentor/s

Dawn Melzer Deirdre Yeater Heather Hill Kathleen Dudzinski Teri Bolton

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Creativity tests, such as non-verbal tasks are able to assess cognitive processes. With creativity, there is more room for expression, as there is less bias than a standard IQ test. The Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT; Torrance, 1974) are the leading method of assessing creative abilities in an individual person. In the current study, creativity was assessed in dolphins and preschoolers using a non-verbal modified TTCT. Both human and animal participants were trained using a “create” innovate prompt in which they would demonstrate a non-repeated novel behavior in order to be reinforced. Sessions were coded for fluency (number of novel behaviors demonstrated), originality, and flexibility (low, medium or high activity level). Preliminary results suggest that training most likely influenced fluency and originality scores. When asked to “create” dolphins did not offer many novel actions and instead selected from a repertoire of previously trained behaviors. Related to flexibility, dolphins displayed more low energy activity levels compared to the children. Children do not have behavioral training and are not similarly limited. While this led to more original innovate behaviors it may have also led to fewer behaviors since they did not have a previously reinforced behavior list to select from. Given the limited understanding of creative abilities in animals and young children, this comparison using a modified version of the TTCT offers exciting possibilities that may have a wide applicability to a variety of animals under human care and possibly children with developmental delays.

College and Major available

College of Arts and Sciences, Psychology BS

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

PSYCHOLOGY CAPSTONE: RESEARCH PS-397-AO, Dr. Dawn Melzer

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

5-5-2021 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

5-5-2021 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Madison Bradley, Biology major, Honors student, Class of 2021

Honorable mention, Dean's Prize: College of Arts and Sciences 2021 award.

Comments

Abstract was accepted to be presented at American Psychological Association's Annual Convention in August 2021!

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May 5th, 1:00 PM May 5th, 4:00 PM

A Comparative Test of Creative Thinking in Dolphins and Preschool Children

Digital Commons

Creativity tests, such as non-verbal tasks are able to assess cognitive processes. With creativity, there is more room for expression, as there is less bias than a standard IQ test. The Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT; Torrance, 1974) are the leading method of assessing creative abilities in an individual person. In the current study, creativity was assessed in dolphins and preschoolers using a non-verbal modified TTCT. Both human and animal participants were trained using a “create” innovate prompt in which they would demonstrate a non-repeated novel behavior in order to be reinforced. Sessions were coded for fluency (number of novel behaviors demonstrated), originality, and flexibility (low, medium or high activity level). Preliminary results suggest that training most likely influenced fluency and originality scores. When asked to “create” dolphins did not offer many novel actions and instead selected from a repertoire of previously trained behaviors. Related to flexibility, dolphins displayed more low energy activity levels compared to the children. Children do not have behavioral training and are not similarly limited. While this led to more original innovate behaviors it may have also led to fewer behaviors since they did not have a previously reinforced behavior list to select from. Given the limited understanding of creative abilities in animals and young children, this comparison using a modified version of the TTCT offers exciting possibilities that may have a wide applicability to a variety of animals under human care and possibly children with developmental delays.