First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Emily CrispinoFollow

Mentor/s

Professor Jareb and Professor Moras

Participation Type

Paper Talk

Abstract

Ableism is defined simply as discrimination in favor of able-bodied people. Whether it is a conscious or unconscious bias, many able-bodied people tend to believe that people with disabilities are less capable than themselves. Employment is an area in which implicit biases are often used when considering people with disabilities for job positions. In many cases, people with disabilities are denied employment opportunities due to assumptions that they will be less capable than able-bodied candidates. However, each individual with a disability has a unique set of traits and skills. Some individuals have physical disabilities while others have learning or cognitive disabilities. Therefore, operating under the assumption that all people with disabilities are less capable than able-bodied people is a clear example of ableism.

The issue of discrimination of those with disabilities in employment is one that needs to be brought to people’s attention. It is so important for employers to educate themselves on disability inclusion and the individuality that exists within disability. It is ignorant to believe that all people with disabilities are less capable than all able-bodied people in the workplace. This is an issue that disability inclusion advocates have spoken out about for years in an attempt to reduce the implicit biases against people with disabilities that exist in employment. This paper makes the argument that though the Americans with Disabilities Act was created to eliminate disability discrimination, ableism and implicit biases continue to play a significant role in the employment and treatment of people with disabilities in the workplace. Ultimately, stigmatizing people with disabilities and preventing otherwise qualified individuals from obtaining opportunities and advancements.

College and Major available

Accounting

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

Honors Capstone, HN-300, Professor Jareb and Professor Moras

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

5-5-2021 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

5-5-2021 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Emily Crispino, Accounting Major, Financial Analytics Minor, Honors Minor, 2021

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May 5th, 1:00 PM May 5th, 4:00 PM

The Impact of Ableism on Disability Discrimination in Employment

Digital Commons

Ableism is defined simply as discrimination in favor of able-bodied people. Whether it is a conscious or unconscious bias, many able-bodied people tend to believe that people with disabilities are less capable than themselves. Employment is an area in which implicit biases are often used when considering people with disabilities for job positions. In many cases, people with disabilities are denied employment opportunities due to assumptions that they will be less capable than able-bodied candidates. However, each individual with a disability has a unique set of traits and skills. Some individuals have physical disabilities while others have learning or cognitive disabilities. Therefore, operating under the assumption that all people with disabilities are less capable than able-bodied people is a clear example of ableism.

The issue of discrimination of those with disabilities in employment is one that needs to be brought to people’s attention. It is so important for employers to educate themselves on disability inclusion and the individuality that exists within disability. It is ignorant to believe that all people with disabilities are less capable than all able-bodied people in the workplace. This is an issue that disability inclusion advocates have spoken out about for years in an attempt to reduce the implicit biases against people with disabilities that exist in employment. This paper makes the argument that though the Americans with Disabilities Act was created to eliminate disability discrimination, ableism and implicit biases continue to play a significant role in the employment and treatment of people with disabilities in the workplace. Ultimately, stigmatizing people with disabilities and preventing otherwise qualified individuals from obtaining opportunities and advancements.

 

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