First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Erin ZuckFollow

Mentor/s

Dr. Tammy Lampley

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

New graduate nurses are often hesitant to voice safety concerns despite having a responsibility to do so. Lack of assertive communication is counter to institutional and professional standards, and may lead to serious consequences. A search of Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE, PubMed, Nursing and Allied Health, and Google Scholar databases was conducted to answer the question In new graduate nurses, how does participating in a mentorship program compared to no mentorship affect assertive communication during the first year of practice? Inclusion criteria were peer-reviewed articles written in English, and published between 2015 and 2020. Exclusion criteria were books; dissertations; magazines; trade journals; articles in a language other than English; and studies pertaining to tool development, nurse retention only, or populations other than new graduate nurses. John Hopkins Evidence Based Appraisal Tools were used to guide the appraisal of evidence. Limitations to the existing literature include an absence of Level I and II studies, and studies examining incidences of actualized or missed opportunities to voice safety concerns rather than new graduate nurses’ self-reported willingness to report a safety concern. Due to the limited nature of the evidence, the proposed question cannot definitively be answered. However, the evidence is consistent in reporting several findings including the value of supportive environments and employing multiple strategies.

College and Major available

Nursing MSN (online)

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

NU691 Dr. Lampley

Location

Digital Commons

Start Day/Time

5-5-2021 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

5-5-2021 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Erin Zuck, MSN Nursing Education, 2021

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May 5th, 1:00 PM May 5th, 4:00 PM

Effect of Mentorship on New Graduate Nurses’ Assertive Communication: An Evidence Review

Digital Commons

New graduate nurses are often hesitant to voice safety concerns despite having a responsibility to do so. Lack of assertive communication is counter to institutional and professional standards, and may lead to serious consequences. A search of Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE, PubMed, Nursing and Allied Health, and Google Scholar databases was conducted to answer the question In new graduate nurses, how does participating in a mentorship program compared to no mentorship affect assertive communication during the first year of practice? Inclusion criteria were peer-reviewed articles written in English, and published between 2015 and 2020. Exclusion criteria were books; dissertations; magazines; trade journals; articles in a language other than English; and studies pertaining to tool development, nurse retention only, or populations other than new graduate nurses. John Hopkins Evidence Based Appraisal Tools were used to guide the appraisal of evidence. Limitations to the existing literature include an absence of Level I and II studies, and studies examining incidences of actualized or missed opportunities to voice safety concerns rather than new graduate nurses’ self-reported willingness to report a safety concern. Due to the limited nature of the evidence, the proposed question cannot definitively be answered. However, the evidence is consistent in reporting several findings including the value of supportive environments and employing multiple strategies.

 

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