First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Sarah CliftFollow

Mentor/s

Professor Mark Jareb Professor Amanda Moras

Participation Type

Paper Talk

Abstract

What is global stratification? Global stratification “refers to the unequal distribution of wealth, power, prestige, resources, and influence among the world’s nations. Put more simply, there is an extreme difference between the richest and poorest nations” (University of Minnesota, 2010). According to the United Nations, 40% of the world’s population -or about two billion people- live on less than $2 per day (United Nations Development Programme, 2005). If the world were one nation, its median annual income would only be about $1,700; the richest fifth of the world’s population would have three-fourths of the world’s entire income while the poorest one fifth would only have about 1.5% of the total income. Based on this data and the following research that will be presented, the unequal distribution of wealth and resources around the globe becomes evident. In order to better understand global stratification and solutions to this unjustness, the bigger question must be addressed: why does this happen and what exactly does it affect?

College and Major available

Digital Marketing MS, Marketing BS

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

HN-300-B, Professor Jareb and Professor Moras

Location

Session D: West Campus West Building W114

Start Day/Time

4-29-2022 1:15 PM

End Day/Time

4-29-2022 2:15 PM

Students' Information

Sarah Clift

Major: Marketing, Minor: Digital Marketing, Honors

Honors Student

Graduating: May, 2022

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Apr 29th, 1:15 PM Apr 29th, 2:15 PM

Global Stratification: What It Is, Why Does It Happen, and What Does It Affect

Session D: West Campus West Building W114

What is global stratification? Global stratification “refers to the unequal distribution of wealth, power, prestige, resources, and influence among the world’s nations. Put more simply, there is an extreme difference between the richest and poorest nations” (University of Minnesota, 2010). According to the United Nations, 40% of the world’s population -or about two billion people- live on less than $2 per day (United Nations Development Programme, 2005). If the world were one nation, its median annual income would only be about $1,700; the richest fifth of the world’s population would have three-fourths of the world’s entire income while the poorest one fifth would only have about 1.5% of the total income. Based on this data and the following research that will be presented, the unequal distribution of wealth and resources around the globe becomes evident. In order to better understand global stratification and solutions to this unjustness, the bigger question must be addressed: why does this happen and what exactly does it affect?

 

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