First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Kaitlin BroylesFollow

Mentor/s

Brian Stiltner, Suzanne Deschenes

Participation Type

Paper Talk

Abstract

Joy. Anger. Sadness. Fear. Disgust. The movie Inside Out shows personified versions of these emotions and how they mature inside the brain of a young girl as she grows. Although the actual human brain is devoid of these emotion characters, people’s brains and emotions still develop and learn to cooperate with one another as they mature. Children and teenagers are sent to school to learn and to progress their development, but the traditional educational curriculum is missing a key component in helping children discover themselves and their potential.

Dance could be this missing piece. There is much more to the art of dance than stepping along to music or leaping across a stage. Dance is a thorough combination of creativity and physical activity that provides numerous mental, physical, and emotional benefits. Additionally, children of all ages and abilities can experience these benefits and introducing them to this type of movement in a school setting allows them to try it without making a complete extracurricular commitment. This small yet crucial introduction to dance is the key to navigating the many emotions and complexities that come with growing up.

Public education has been a foundational pillar in America since society began. The need to prepare children for adulthood and their roles in society has been apparent since colonial times, yet funding education has been a persistent issue, especially providing funding for children of all races, genders, and ethnicities. Additionally, not all educational subjects have been treated with equal importance. Due to the technological path the world is on, scientific subjects have been at the forefront of the educational curriculum. Physical education classes have also been incorporated in the curriculum since the American colonial period but took centuries to develop into the classes seen in schools today. However, despite the development of both academic and gym classes, dance has rarely been incorporated into curriculums despite its many physical and mental benefits. It is an intellectually stimulating form of physical activity that develops one’s artistic skills, and it appeals to many different learning styles, unlike traditional teaching methods. Dance deserves a place in educational curriculums across the country and its numerous benefits must be laid out to those who wish to further advance education.

College and Major available

Exercise Science BS

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

Honors Capstone, HN-300, Brian Stiltner and Suzanne Deschenes

Location

Session L: West Campus West Building W112

Start Day/Time

4-29-2022 1:15 PM

End Day/Time

4-29-2022 2:15 PM

Students' Information

Kaitlin Broyles, Exercise Science, Honors student, 2023

Share

COinS
 
Apr 29th, 1:15 PM Apr 29th, 2:15 PM

A Look Inside the Educational Curriculum: Why is Dance Cast Out?

Session L: West Campus West Building W112

Joy. Anger. Sadness. Fear. Disgust. The movie Inside Out shows personified versions of these emotions and how they mature inside the brain of a young girl as she grows. Although the actual human brain is devoid of these emotion characters, people’s brains and emotions still develop and learn to cooperate with one another as they mature. Children and teenagers are sent to school to learn and to progress their development, but the traditional educational curriculum is missing a key component in helping children discover themselves and their potential.

Dance could be this missing piece. There is much more to the art of dance than stepping along to music or leaping across a stage. Dance is a thorough combination of creativity and physical activity that provides numerous mental, physical, and emotional benefits. Additionally, children of all ages and abilities can experience these benefits and introducing them to this type of movement in a school setting allows them to try it without making a complete extracurricular commitment. This small yet crucial introduction to dance is the key to navigating the many emotions and complexities that come with growing up.

Public education has been a foundational pillar in America since society began. The need to prepare children for adulthood and their roles in society has been apparent since colonial times, yet funding education has been a persistent issue, especially providing funding for children of all races, genders, and ethnicities. Additionally, not all educational subjects have been treated with equal importance. Due to the technological path the world is on, scientific subjects have been at the forefront of the educational curriculum. Physical education classes have also been incorporated in the curriculum since the American colonial period but took centuries to develop into the classes seen in schools today. However, despite the development of both academic and gym classes, dance has rarely been incorporated into curriculums despite its many physical and mental benefits. It is an intellectually stimulating form of physical activity that develops one’s artistic skills, and it appeals to many different learning styles, unlike traditional teaching methods. Dance deserves a place in educational curriculums across the country and its numerous benefits must be laid out to those who wish to further advance education.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.