First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Shannon JordanFollow

Mentor/s

Professor Mark Jareb Professor Rachel Bowman

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

As a result of a largely aging population and continuously increasing life expectancy, the prevalence of orthopedic injury in the United States continues to rise and harps a significant burden on both the health care system and the millions of patients suffering each day. The current treatment options, most notably surgical procedures, and opioid narcotics, are fraught with subpar results and can cause adverse or worsening effects, warranting a consideration into what can and should be done differently in the treatment of these injuries. Interventional orthopedics is a non-surgical approach that falls under the umbrella of regenerative medicine, the type of treatment that promotes the body’s natural healing abilities using ortho-biologic agents. The process of interventional orthopedics begins with the determination and extraction of proper injectates, such as platelet-rich plasma, autologous conditioned serum, mesenchymal stem cells, or adipose fat cells, to facilitate the healing. From there, the injectate is precisely placed into the injured region using imaging tools such as ultrasound and x-ray. It can improve a wide variety of musculoskeletal injuries including, but not limited to, bone breaks and fractures, joint cartilage loss, tendon and muscle tears, arthritis, and pinched nerves. While high level research is still being conducted, there are already a multitude of studies that have proven the success of interventional orthopedics, compared to surgeries, both on a short and long term basis. However, there are ethical, financial, and educational implications associated with interventional orthopedics that obstruct the procedure from being as renowned as the more traditional approaches to treating orthopedic injury. The procedure is not yet approved by the FDA, most insurance companies do not cover it, and very few educational institutions incorporate regenerative medicine into their medical curriculum. Despite this, interventional orthopedics is an extremely promising alternative to current treatments for musculoskeletal injury. In the end, patient care and well-being should be at the forefront of any medical debate, and this procedure certainly has the potential to reverse the current orthopedic injury epidemic.

College and Major available

Biology

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

Honors Capstone HN-300, Professor Jareb and Bowman

Location

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Start Day/Time

4-29-2022 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-29-2022 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Shannon Jordan - Biology Major in 3+3 DPT Program - Honors student - Class of 2022

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 4:00 PM

Interventional Orthopedics: The Future of Musculoskeletal Injury Treatment

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

As a result of a largely aging population and continuously increasing life expectancy, the prevalence of orthopedic injury in the United States continues to rise and harps a significant burden on both the health care system and the millions of patients suffering each day. The current treatment options, most notably surgical procedures, and opioid narcotics, are fraught with subpar results and can cause adverse or worsening effects, warranting a consideration into what can and should be done differently in the treatment of these injuries. Interventional orthopedics is a non-surgical approach that falls under the umbrella of regenerative medicine, the type of treatment that promotes the body’s natural healing abilities using ortho-biologic agents. The process of interventional orthopedics begins with the determination and extraction of proper injectates, such as platelet-rich plasma, autologous conditioned serum, mesenchymal stem cells, or adipose fat cells, to facilitate the healing. From there, the injectate is precisely placed into the injured region using imaging tools such as ultrasound and x-ray. It can improve a wide variety of musculoskeletal injuries including, but not limited to, bone breaks and fractures, joint cartilage loss, tendon and muscle tears, arthritis, and pinched nerves. While high level research is still being conducted, there are already a multitude of studies that have proven the success of interventional orthopedics, compared to surgeries, both on a short and long term basis. However, there are ethical, financial, and educational implications associated with interventional orthopedics that obstruct the procedure from being as renowned as the more traditional approaches to treating orthopedic injury. The procedure is not yet approved by the FDA, most insurance companies do not cover it, and very few educational institutions incorporate regenerative medicine into their medical curriculum. Despite this, interventional orthopedics is an extremely promising alternative to current treatments for musculoskeletal injury. In the end, patient care and well-being should be at the forefront of any medical debate, and this procedure certainly has the potential to reverse the current orthopedic injury epidemic.

 

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