First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Stephanie SullivanFollow

Mentor/s

Dr. Suzanne Marmo

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Standing alongside a child as they ring the celebration bell symbolizing the end of their chemotherapy or radiation treatment must be one of the most rewarding feelings as a nurse. Being there from the start of their journey, providing care for both the children and their families, and then eventually seeing them beat cancer can provide both a sense of accomplishment, as well as satisfaction. Although outcomes for treating children with cancer tend to be more favorable than those of adults, fatalities of children continue to place burden on healthcare workers and families. This research focuses on the development of compassion fatigue in pediatric oncology nurses and assesses the best interventions for it. Furthermore, research delves into the option healthcare organizations have to either replace nurses leaving their jobs due to compassion fatigue or to provide the resources needed, along with mental health professionals as supportive services for their nurses. The research has shown that with the correct education and resources, pediatric oncology nurses may be well-equipped to prevent compassion fatigue, contributing to healthcare savings and improvement in the safety and well-being of their patients.

College and Major available

Nursing BSN

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

HN300 Dr. Marmo & Steele

Location

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Start Day/Time

4-29-2022 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-29-2022 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Stephanie Sullivan - Nursing, Honors student, 2023

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 4:00 PM

Overcoming the Holistic Effects of Compassion Fatigue as a Pediatric Oncology Nurse

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Standing alongside a child as they ring the celebration bell symbolizing the end of their chemotherapy or radiation treatment must be one of the most rewarding feelings as a nurse. Being there from the start of their journey, providing care for both the children and their families, and then eventually seeing them beat cancer can provide both a sense of accomplishment, as well as satisfaction. Although outcomes for treating children with cancer tend to be more favorable than those of adults, fatalities of children continue to place burden on healthcare workers and families. This research focuses on the development of compassion fatigue in pediatric oncology nurses and assesses the best interventions for it. Furthermore, research delves into the option healthcare organizations have to either replace nurses leaving their jobs due to compassion fatigue or to provide the resources needed, along with mental health professionals as supportive services for their nurses. The research has shown that with the correct education and resources, pediatric oncology nurses may be well-equipped to prevent compassion fatigue, contributing to healthcare savings and improvement in the safety and well-being of their patients.

 

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