Mentor/s

Rachel E. Bowman

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a common environmental endocrine disruptor exerting effects on many parameters (neural, physiological, and behavioral measures) via both estrogen and androgen receptors. BPA is an industrial compound used to make polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, such as CDs and DVDs, electronic equipment, cars, sports safety equipment, and is widely used in the manufacturing of hard plastic products such as food storage containers, bathtubs and countertops, can linings, and reusable bottles. Detectable levels of BPA have been reported in body fluids of humans and animals, indicating BPA exposure is ubiquitous and a potential health hazard (review, Prins, 2019).

College and Major available

College of Arts and Sciences, Neuroscience, Psychology BS

Location

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Start Day/Time

4-29-2022 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-29-2022 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Olivia Chaponis, Neuroscience, 2022

Nicole Alvira, Psychology, 2022

Abigail Andre, Neuroscience, 2023

Richard Ginocchio, Neuroscience, 2023

Jamie Herrick, Neuroscience, 2022

Petar Janicijevic, Psychology, 2022

Tahira Regaldo, Psychology, 2022

Nikaash Pasnoori, research volunteer, 2021 UCONN graduate, former non-matriculated SHU 2021 summer course student.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 4:00 PM

What's In Your Water? Low-dose bisphenol-A alters weight gain and anxiety, but leaves cognitive functioning intact.

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a common environmental endocrine disruptor exerting effects on many parameters (neural, physiological, and behavioral measures) via both estrogen and androgen receptors. BPA is an industrial compound used to make polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, such as CDs and DVDs, electronic equipment, cars, sports safety equipment, and is widely used in the manufacturing of hard plastic products such as food storage containers, bathtubs and countertops, can linings, and reusable bottles. Detectable levels of BPA have been reported in body fluids of humans and animals, indicating BPA exposure is ubiquitous and a potential health hazard (review, Prins, 2019).