First and Last Name/s of Presenters

Nina DiProfioFollow
Larissa BritoFollow
Mia PoppingaFollow

Title of Poster or Paper

The Effect of Self Affirmation on Memory

Mentor/s

Adrienne Crowell

Participation Type

Poster

Abstract

Infants have demonstrated object permanence understanding during violation of expectation tasks. During these tasks, infants are shown expected (e.g., ball stops at wall) or unexpected events (e.g., ball rolling through a solid wall). Infants look longer at the unexpected event versus the expected tasks (Stahl et al., 2015). Studies have shown that dogs also looked longer at an unexpected events during object permanence tasks (Pattison et al., 2010). In the current study, dogs were presented with a violation of expectation task commonly used with infants to investigate their object permanence abilities. It was hypothesized that dogs participating in the experiment would look longer at an unexpected event than an expected one.

College and Major available

Psychology BS

Course Name and Number, Professor Name

Research Assistantship PS-397-C, Crowell

Location

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Start Day/Time

4-29-2022 1:00 PM

End Day/Time

4-29-2022 4:00 PM

Students' Information

Nina DiProfio, Psychology, 2023

Larissa Brito, Psychology, honors, 2022

Mia Poppinga, Psychology, 2023

Share

COinS
 
Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 4:00 PM

The Effect of Self Affirmation on Memory

Digital Commons & West Campus West Building

Infants have demonstrated object permanence understanding during violation of expectation tasks. During these tasks, infants are shown expected (e.g., ball stops at wall) or unexpected events (e.g., ball rolling through a solid wall). Infants look longer at the unexpected event versus the expected tasks (Stahl et al., 2015). Studies have shown that dogs also looked longer at an unexpected events during object permanence tasks (Pattison et al., 2010). In the current study, dogs were presented with a violation of expectation task commonly used with infants to investigate their object permanence abilities. It was hypothesized that dogs participating in the experiment would look longer at an unexpected event than an expected one.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.